Horseradish Mashed Potatoes Recipe

overhead bowl of mashed potatoes

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These horseradish mashed potatoes are filled with chives, sour cream, milk, and horseradish. They are perfect as a side to red meat, including steak or prime rib. 

I have an email that I send out to my email list once a week on Saturdays. It’s called Spice Saturday, and every Saturday I go to the grocery store and pick out one random spice from the spice shelf. I come home and use that spice to cook a 30 minute recipe, which I then send out to my email list! 

The recipe normally comes with some fun facts about the spice and some strange history, such as how Marcus Aurelius’s subjects used to call him Cuminus after the spice cumin. I love when people open my emails and click around my website, and, of course, I love when they use the spices that are in my Spice Saturday emails!

A few weeks ago I got an email from a reader asking for help. This reader loves horseradish, and hates that she can only have horseradish when she’s using it as a sauce on her steak or prime rib! She asked if I had any recipes that used horseradish where she would be able to enjoy her favorite flavor in a different way. 

Enter: horseradish mashed potatoes. Horseradish isn’t normally my favorite flavor, and I tend to avoid horsey sauce when eating meat. BUT I loved mashed potatoes, and I know that potatoes are a pretty popular meat side dish. Why not put them together? 

I whipped up these horseradish mashed potatoes at home, and we enjoyed them that evening with red meat. My family LOVED them! These are a super big hit, and I’m so glad that my reader took me out of my comfort zone in order to make them. 

potatoes plated with prime rib

What Ingredients are in These Horseradish Mashed Potatoes? 

Potatoes 
Butter 
Milk 
Sour cream 
Salt 
Black pepper 
Onion Powder
Garlic Powder 
Green onions
Horseradish

For full ingredient measurements, visit the recipe card at the bottom of the page. 

What is Horseradish?

Horseradish is a root that comes from the same family as broccoli and wasabi. Sometimes the leaves of horseradish are cooked, but, most commonly, horseradish is harvested for its roots. 

When first pulled from the ground, horseradish appears harmless. However, when the root is cut or scraped, two components in the horseradish– sinigrin and myrosin– combine to make a nostril clearing scent. 

The aroma that comes from the horseradish is cause for its polarizing tendency. The root is spicy, but without a lingering pain, a phenomenon that is addicting for many people! You can eat horseradish and feel the pungency of the flavor, and in a few moments forget it happened at all. This is probably why people chase the taste!

close up of horseradish mashed potatoes

Where is Horseradish in the Grocery Store?

You have a couple of options… First, you can buy fresh horseradish and grate it yourself. If you’re looking for fresh horseradish it can be found in the produce aisle. However, it’s very uncommon for most grocery stores to carry fresh horseradish. Your more likely option would be to find it in the condiment aisle. 

The jarred horseradish is normally found near the condiments. A common place to find it would be amongst the mustards, relishes, etc. 

Your jarred horseradish can stay at room temperature until opened. Once opened, make sure to store it in the fridge. 

How to Make Horseradish Mashed Potatoes

In a large pot, boil the potatoes until tender, about 30-40 minutes. You should be able to pierce them easily with a fork.  

Drain the potatoes and then place them back into the pot. Add melted butter and milk and mash with a potato masher until smooth and creamy, adding more milk if necessary. 

Add the rest of the ingredients into the potatoes, and use a spoon to mix until well combined, adding more horseradish if you like a stronger flavor. 

front view of mashed potatoes

What Potatoes are Best for Mashing? 

You’ll want to choose potatoes that are high in starch. I used russet potatoes, but the yukon gold variety is a good option as well. Try to steer clear of red skinned potatoes and similar varieties, as they will take longer to break down and will more likely result in gluey potatoes. 

How Do I Mash my Potatoes? 

Whatever you do, avoid a food processor or a handheld mixer. When you boil potatoes, the starch in them becomes very delicate. This is amplified when you begin mashing or mixing your potatoes.

Overmixing your potatoes will result in more starch being released, which in turn makes for potato paste instead of mashed potatoes. The texture turns out almost like a glue instead of the fluffy potatoes that you want. 

I stick with my tried and true potato masher. Just make sure to use a little elbow grease and clear out those lumps! 

with prime rib in the background

What Should I Eat with My Horseradish Mashed Potatoes? 

Great question! Your horseradish mashed potatoes can be enjoyed any time that normal mashed potatoes can be. However, the best option is when you’re eating red meat with which you would normally serve horsey sauce!

The horseradish flavor blends beautifully with the meat, and adding that flavor into mashed potatoes gives that flavor more body. 

If you enjoyed this recipe for horseradish mashed potatoes, leave a comment telling me what you thought! If you want more potato recipes from The Foreign Fork, you should check out: 

Horseradish Mashed Potatoes Pinterest Graphic 6

Horseradish Mashed Potatoes

These horseradish mashed potatoes are filled with chives, sour cream, milk, and horseradish. They are perfect as a side to red meat, including steak or prime rib.

Course potatoes, Side Dish
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Servings 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 4 potatoes peeled and cut into cubes
  • 2 tbsp butter melted
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup sour cream
  • 1/3 tsp salt
  • Fresh ground pepper to taste
  • 1/2 tsp onion powder
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tbsp horseradish or more to taste
  • Green part of 3 green onions chopped

Instructions

  1. In a large pot, boil the potatoes until tender, about 30-40 minutes. You should be able to pierce them easily with a fork.
  2. Drain the potatoes and then place them back into the pot. Add melted butter and milk and mash with a potato masher until smooth and creamy, adding more milk if necessary.
  3. Add the rest of the ingredients into the potatoes, and use a spoon to mix until well combined, adding more horseradish if you like a stronger flavor.
  4. Enjoy! Leave a comment on this recipe letting me know what you thought.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational and personal use. 

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