Thai Peanut Noodles in the Instant Pot

Thai Peanut Noodles in a bowl

This Thai Peanut Noodles recipe is fantastic for a quick and delicious better-than-takeout meal. The noodles are cooked in a rich and delicious Peanut Sauce. The recipe comes together, start to finish, in under 30 minutes, and it all happens in your Instant Pot!

Listen up everyone, because you need to make this recipe for Thai Peanut Noodles right now!! This recipe is absolutely delicious. The flavors come together in a spectacular way that makes this dish full of umami flavor but also sweet and salty at the same time. 

The recipe all comes together in your Instant Pot, which means that you have relatively no dishes, and a super quick meal! In fact, this recipe comes together in less than 30 minutes from start to finish…. And it only cooks for 6 minutes!

I enjoy this recipe more than any Thai Peanut Noodles takeout I’ve ever gotten! You’re going to love throwing this recipe together and then watching the magic unfold. 

close up of Thai Peanut Noodles

What Ingredients are in this Thai Peanut Noodles Recipe? 

Carrots, peeled into strips with a peeler
Red pepper
Olive oil 
Garlic
Chicken stock 
Spaghetti
Green onions
Cilantro 
Peanuts
Thai Peanut Sauce

instant pot noodles in bowl

What is Thai Peanut Sauce Made Of? 

Creamy peanut butter
Rice vinegar
Sesame oil 
Lime juice
Soy sauce
Brown sugar
Chili paste

close up of noodles

How to Make Thai Peanut Noodles in the Instant Pot? 

In a small mixing bowl, combine all of the sauce ingredients and whisk together. Set aside. 

Turn your Instant Pot to the low saute setting. Warm 2 tbsp olive oil. Once warm, add chopped garlic. Saute about two minutes, or until the garlic begins to change color. 

Add the red pepper and carrot in the pot and saute for about 5 minutes, until the vegetables are sauted to a texture you’d like to eat. Use tongs to remove the vegetables from the Instant Pot. Put in a small bowl and set aside. 

Add the chicken broth into the Instant Pot, using a wooden spoon to scrape up any burnt bits. 

Pour the Sauce into the instant pot, and whisk together with the stock. 

Add the noodles (broken in half) into the Instant Pot. Spoon some liquid over the noodles if necessary. 

Place lid on Instant Pot and set to MANUAL for 4 minutes. When the cooking cycle is complete, allow for a 2 minute natural release, then perform a quick release. 

Open the Instant Pot and turn to KEEP WARM. The pasta will be liquidy. That is okay. Allow the pasta to sit without the lid for about 5-10 minutes on KEEP WARM until the extra liquid is absorbed. While you are waiting, add the sauteed vegetables back into the pot. Also add your cilantro, green onions, and peanuts.

When the sauce has reached your desired consistency, Enjoy! Top with extra peanuts or garnishments if desired. 

Leave a comment on this post letting me know what you thought.  

How to Cut the Carrots

For this recipe, the vegetables must be very, very thin. Instead of taking my time (and risking my fingers) to cut the carrots into matchsticks, I used my vegetable peeler!

Initially, I peeled the outer layer off of my carrot to get away any dirt. Then, instead of cutting my carrot, I continued to use the peeler to peel off layer after layer. I reserved these peelings, and it’s what I used for my carrots!

I like making carrots this way because they are thinner than you’d ever safely be able to get them with a knife. It’s also so much faster using your vegetable peeler than cutting the carrot into such thin, small pieces! 

forkful of instant pot noodles

Why is my Sauce Watery when I Open my Instant Pot? 

The Instant Pot needs 3 cups of liquid to every 8 ounces of pasta that it is cooking. This means that when you open the lid to your Instant Pot, the sauce may be a bit more liquidy than you’d prefer. That’s okay! 

Keep the lid off of the pot, and turn it to the KEEP WARM function for 5-10 minutes. The noodles will absorb the excess liquid, and the noodles will reach your desired consistency. 

As the noodles continue to cool they will absorb more of the peanut sauce. Be careful to not overcook them, as you don’t want the sauce to dry out later!

What Goes with Thai Peanut Noodles? 

We love eating these noodles with chicken! Normally my mom will just pan fry some chicken tenderloins and then top them with some peanut butter and lime juice.

If you have frozen chicken, you can add them on top of the raw noodles and cook as described. You do not need to increase cook time. 

If you are a fan of seafood, you can also serve shrimp with this dish! If you have frozen shrimp, you can add them into the Instant Pot on top of the raw noodles and cook as described. You do not need to increase cooking time for this option, either! 

How to Garnish your Thai Peanut Noodles 

The very best part of this dish are the garnishments that go on top! The sauce is spectacular, but piling the noodles high with garnishments make it that much better. 

My favorite options are taking extra peanuts and chopping them up with a knife or a nut chopper. I sprinkle these on top of the noodles. 

You can also cut up green onions and pile those on as well. I love the easy, fresh taste that the green onions give to the peanut sauce. 

If you’re more of a spicy-food-lover (unlike myself) you can top the noodles with chiles or extra chile sauce. Feel free to customize your toppings as much as you’d like. This is your dish after all!

Did you like this recipe for Thai Peanut Noodles? If so, leave a comment on this post letting me know what you thought! Don’t forget to post a photo on Instagram or Facebook with the #TheForeignFork and tag @TheForeignFork. 

If you liked this recipe, you’ll also love these other Foreign Fork Instant Pot Pasta Recipes!

Thai Peanut Noodles in the Instant Pot

Thai Peanut Noodles in the Instant Pot

This Thai Peanut Noodles recipe is fantastic for a quick and delicious better-than-takeout meal. The noodles are cooked in a rich and delicious Peanut Sauce. The recipe comes together, start to finish, in under 30 minutes, and it all happens in your Instant Pot!

Course instant pot, noodles, pasta
Cuisine thailand
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 6 minutes
Pressure Building 8 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 large carrots peeled into strips with a peeler
  • 1 red pepper sliced very thin
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp garlic
  • 2 ½ cups chicken stock
  • 8 oz noodles broken in half
  • ¼ cup green onions + more for topping
  • ¼ cup cilantro + more for topping
  • ½ cup peanuts chopped + more for topping

Sauce Ingredients

  • ¾ cup + 1 tbsp creamy peanut butter
  • 1 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 2 tbsp lime juice
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • Chili paste to taste

Instructions

  1. In a small mixing bowl, combine all of the sauce ingredients and whisk together. Set aside.
  2. Turn your Instant Pot to the low saute setting. Warm 2 tbsp olive oil. Once warm, add chopped garlic. Saute about two minutes, or until the garlic begins to change color.
  3. Add the red pepper and carrot in the pot and saute for about 5 minutes, until the vegetables are sauted to a texture you’d like to eat. Use tongs to remove the vegetables from the Instant Pot. Put in a small bowl and set aside.

  4. Add the chicken broth into the Instant Pot, using a wooden spoon to scrape up any burnt bits.
  5. Add the Sauce into the instant pot, and whisk together with the stock.
  6. Add the noodles (broken in half) into the Instant Pot. Spoon some liquid over the noodles if necessary.
  7. Place lid on Instant Pot and set to MANUAL for 4 minutes. When the cooking cycle is complete, allow for a 2 minute natural release, then perform a quick release.
  8. Open the Instant Pot and turn to KEEP WARM. The pasta will be liquidy. That is okay. Allow the pasta to sit without the lid for about 5-10 minutes on KEEP WARM until the extra liquid is absorbed. While you are waiting, add the sauteed vegetables back into the pot. Also add your cilantro, green onions, and peanuts.
  9. When the sauce has reached your desired consistency, Enjoy! Top with extra peanuts or garnishments if desired.
  10. Leave a comment on this post letting me know what you thought.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 

Fish Soup Recipe from Cambodia

This Cambodian fish soup recipe, also known as Amok in Cambodia, is a delicious soup made with cod and coconut cream. The soup gets much of its flavor from the fresh herbs in this recipe, including fresh cilantro and fresh mint. The best way to serve this fish soup (for looks and for taste) is with a beautiful, hearty dollop of coconut cream on top. MMM! Enjoy! 

Okay, I know. “Fish soup” isn’t the most appealing thing in the world to call this recipe. In fact, I really wanted to call this fish soup its true, authentic name in Cambodian, which is “Amok”. Unfortunately, the people of the interwebs aren’t searching for “amok” on Google, but they are searching for “fish soup.” So, here we are. A very un-pretty name for an actually very delicious meal! 

What is Amok? 

This Cambodian Amok is a very popular dish in Cambodia. Many times it is cooking in a bowl made of banana leaves, and the fish is steamed until the liquid that surrounds it turns the fish into a custard. This can be enjoyed with fish, as it is here, or with chicken or other seafood. 

Amok is one of the most popular dishes in all of Cambodia. Each Cambodian grandmother has their own special way to make this dish, each of which doesn’t live up to anyone else’s grandma.

Every restaurant in Cambodia also serves this dish. Not only is it a delicious, widely popular meal, but it’s also easy to make at home.

Fish Soup with Coconut Milk

This fish soup, or amok, is made with coconut milk. That means that it is dairy free and perfect for pescatarians! It is also Whole30 compliant. Wowwee! Delicious AND healthy. What a perfect meal 😉 

Which Fish is Best to Use? 

Good question! I really liked making this fish soup with cod, mostly because it’s a fish that is familiar to me. Cod is easy to find and easy to cook.

If you’d prefer, you can also make this soup with catfish or snapper. Any fresh water fish that is a bit on the tougher side will work. 

How Long will this Fish Soup Last in the Fridge? 

I tend to be a bit conservative in my recommendations of how long fish will keep in the fridge. A safe bet is that your fish soup will last about 3-4 days in the fridge as long as it is covered and kept cool.

In order to heat up the leftovers, you can microwave them, but my ultimate suggestion is to heat them up on the stove again! 

What Ingredients are in this Fish Soup Recipe? 

  • Olive oil
  • Lemon zest
  • Lime zest
  • Fresh mint
  • Fresh cilantro
  • Garlic
  • Turmeric
  • Coconut milk 
  • Fish sauce 
  • Brown sugar
  • Cod, or another freshwater fish  

How to Make this Fish Soup

Salt and pepper the cod 

Coat the bottom of a sauce pan in olive oil 

Add the zests, garlic, mint, cilantro, and turmeric and cook until fragrant

Stir in coconut milk, fish sauce, and brown sugar and allow to cook for 10 minutes

Add cod and allow to cook for another 10 or so minutes, until cod is cooked all the way through. 

Serve with coconut cream. 

Enjoy! 

Pinterest graphic for amok

How does this Fish Soup Recipe compare to Authentic Amok? 

To be fair, this fish soup recipe is very similar to amok from Cambodia, but it’s not completely the same. First off, amok is made in banana leaf bowls, and when you steam it, the liquid in the fish soup recipe is meant to turn into a custard consistency. This recipe does not truly ever reach that custardy consistency, and instead stays pretty liquid-y!

In Cambodia, this recipe is also made with some ingredients that are more difficult to find in western grocery stores, so I made replacements wherever possible. For example, I replaced the lemongrass in this recipe with lemon and lime zest! 

Well, that’s about everything you need to know about making this amok or fish soup recipe from Cambodia! If you really liked this recipe and want to try more fish recipes from The Foreign Fork, you can also check out these recipes for: 

And, as always, if you make this recipe, don’t forget to take a photo and post it on Facebook and Instagram and tag @TheForeignFork and hashtag #TheForeignFork! Thanks for stopping by and I will see you soon! 

Cambodian Fish Soup Recipe

Cambodian fish soup, also known as Amok in Cambodia, is a delicious soup made with cod and coconut cream. The soup gets much of its flavor from the fresh herbs in this recipe, including fresh cilantro and fresh mint. The best way to serve this fish soup (for looks and for taste) is with a beautiful, hearty dollop of coconut cream on top. MMM! Enjoy!

Course Soup
Cuisine cambodian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

  • Olive oil
  • Zest of one lemon
  • Zest of one lime
  • 2 Handfuls of mint and cilantro together chopped
  • 2 tsp chopped garlic
  • ½ tsp powdered turmeric
  • 1 can coconut milk
  • 2 tsp fish sauce
  • ½ tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 lb cod cut into cubes

Instructions

  1. Salt and pepper your cod
  2. Coat the bottom of a large sauce pan in olive oil
  3. Add the zests, garlic, mint, cilantro, and turmeric and cook, stirring until fragrant
  4. Add coconut milk, fish sauce, and brown sugar and allow to cook for 10 minutes
  5. Add cod and allow to cook for another 10 or so minutes, until cod is cooked all the way through.
  6. Serve with coconut cream.
  7. Enjoy! Leave a review on this post letting me know what you think!

Recipe Notes

Traditional Amok is steamed in banana leaves. It sometimes takes the texture of custard. This amok has similar ingredients to traditional Cambodian amok, but has a different cooking style and, therefore, a different texture. In my opinion, this version is best served over rice.

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 

Tropical Stuffed Avocados from Barbados

Overhead of Tropical Stuffed Avocados

These Tropical Stuffed Avocados feature the fresh flavors of the beautiful Caribbean. Avocado, mango, shrimp, and red onions combine to make a tropical, healthy, flavorful, and quick dinner. What more could you want?!

The Humble Avocado

Ah… the Humble Avocado. So creamy, so beautiful, so versatile. People are gettin’ all kinds of whack with their avocados these days, putting them in brownies and pesto and bread. All that is great and dandy (and interesting… i’d like to try those things), but really, no form of avocado is better than an avocado in its true form. Stuffed avocados are the way to my avocado lovin’ heart.

Tropical Stuffed Avocados

Origins of the Tropical Stuffed Avocado

I have a confession to make. TECHNICALLY these Tropical Stuffed Avocados aren’t a true Barbadian dish. Stuffed avocados do exist in Barbados, but they’re mixed with mayonnaise and celery and they just didn’t feel… fresh to me. When I think of Barbados, I think of fresh, cool fruits and vegetables. I think of healthy produce and delicious, tropical flavors. The mayonnaise in the recipes kind of threw me off. Mayonnaise makes me feel greasy, and when I think of Barbados, greasy is not what comes to mind.

So I took some creative leeway here and I came up with my own Barbadian Tropical Stuffed Avocado recipe. The ingredients are all common enough in Barbados that this dish could be made very easily there. Who knows, maybe they already do!

Tropical Stuffed Avocados

Recipe Adaptations

Either way, I don’t think you’re going to fault me too much, because these Tropical Stuffed Avocados are…. Delicious. I made them once to test for the blog and eat for dinner. Then I made them again the very next day to prep as a lunch for the whole week. Four days later and I still wasn’t sick of them.

If you want to add some extra crunch to this recipe, throw in a few crumbled walnuts! They would taste amazing. If you want to add a few more flavors of Barbados, toss in a little bit of thyme. And if you want to try the recipe the way it’s made in Barbados, throw some mayonnaise in the mix. I won’t fault ya for it, I promise.

If you liked this recipe, check out my recipe for Papaya Pie from Antigua and Barbuda or the Black Bean Cakes from the Caribbean. If you make this recipe, take a photo of it to share on Facebook or Instagram. Make sure to tag @TheForeignFork and hashtag #TheForeignFork. Thanks for stopping by! If you make these Caribbean Stuffed Avocados, leave a comment on my post. It would make my whole day!

Tropical Stuffed Avocados (Barbados)

These Tropical Stuffed Avocados feature the fresh flavors of the beautiful Caribbean. Avocado, mango, shrimp, and red onions combine to make a tropical, healthy, flavorful, and quick dinner. What more could you want?!

Course Main Course
Cuisine Caribbean
Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 avocados gutted and chopped
  • 1 mango chopped
  • 11 oz cocktail shrimp chopped
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tbsp red onion chopped
  • 3 tbsp cilantro chopped
  • 2 tbsp lime juice
  • 1 1/2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt plus more to taste
  • 3/4 tsp marjoram leaves

Instructions

  1. Remove the avocado from the avocado skins. 

  2. In a separate bowl, combine all of the ingredients. 

  3. Place the mixture back into the four avocado halves and enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For personal or educational use only. 


Spicy Shrimp (Dopeaja) from Bangladesh

Shrimp Dopeaja

Shrimp Dopeaja is a Spicy Shrimp dish from Bangladesh made by combining shrimp, onions, tomatoes, and spices to create a phenomenal 30-minute dinner. This dish is spicy and flavorful, and is best served over a bed of white rice.

Bangladesh is famous for its seafood, particularly its freshwater fish. Spicy Shrimp, or Dopeaja, is one of the most famous dishes in the country, most likely because of its ease, flavor, and ability to showcase the amazing seafood of the country.

I chose to make this recipe with shrimp, but you can choose to make the same thing with any freshwater fish. Catfish is a very common ingredient in Dopeaja in Bangladesh. If you do choose to work with fish instead of shrimp, make sure to de-bone the fish and then cut it into small pieces to simmer in the tomato base.

What Ingredients are In This Spicy Shrimp Recipe?

Canola oil
Ginger
Onion
Turmeric
Cayenne
Paprika
Ground red pepper
Tomato 
Onion
Raw shrimp
Water
Sea salt 
Cilantro 
Scallions chopped
White rice 

How to Make Spicy Shrimp

Heat the oil in the pan. Once heated, add the spices, the pureed onion, and a tablespoon of water to the pan, and let cook for about 4 minutes, until fragrant. 

Add the raw shrimp and the onions to the pan and pour the 1/2 cup of water over it. Add the sea salt to taste. Cook covered on medium-high heat for about 8 minutes, then uncover the pan and allow about 3/4 of the water to evaporate out. 

 When the water is almost gone, add the tomato, cilantro, and scallions. Cook for about 8-10 more minutes or until the oil begins to separate. 

Serve over a bed of white rice and enjoy!

What Does “Dopeaja” Mean?

Dopeaja, also spelled as Dopiaza or Do Pyaza, directly translates to “two onions”. During the cooking of a Dopeaja dish, the cook adds onions at two separate times within the cooking process. In this recipe, one serving of onions is pureed in a blender and the other serving is full slices of onion.

Dopeaja up close

Adjusting the Spice Blend

The spice blend added to this Spicy Shrimp is a doozy, dudes (at least to me…). My mouth was on FIYA.

I also, as we all know, can’t handle spicy. But I want to toughen up, so I forced myself to eat this recipe anyways. I’ll get there one day. It didn’t hurt that the taste of the dish was delicious, even if it was too spicy for my preference!

When I made up the recipe for this dish, I chose to make it about half as spicy as normal to account for my personal taste. This means that there is only about ½ tbsp of cayenne pepper in the entire recipe. If you want to test your taste buds like a true Bangladeshi, double that cayenne! I believe in you!

If you, instead, don’t want your dish to be spicy at all, just don’t add the cayenne! Or choose to add less! I haven’t actually made the recipe without the cayenne, but I’m positive that it would still be delicious and flavorful without it.

The rest of the spice blend is still incredible and unique, so if you want to make your Dopeaja a spicy-less Dopeaja, you do you. I’m all for whatever you choose.

How Do I Prepare Shrimp?

Cleaning fresh shrimp isn’t always the most glamorous job, but sometimes, it needs to be done. If you’re cleaning your own shrimp at home, here are a few tips for you:

  1. Pinch the skin and peel away from the shrimp, removing any of the shell with the legs attached
  2. Make sure to remove the black line that runs along the shrimp’s back. This is the digestive track. Run a knife along the back of the shrimp, opening up the skin to expose the digestive track. Then, use your fingers to pull it away from the shrimp
  3. After peeling and deveining your shrimp, make sure to rinse and dry them
  4. You can freeze the shrimp shells to use for stock later on

Do I Peel the Shrimp Before or After Cooking?

Depending on the dish that you’re making, you can choose to do either! Some recipes (like this Shrimp Boil) are absolutely delicious when the shrimp is cooked in the shell.

In this case, the shrimp shell preserves the flavor and allows it to stick around longer.

Because we’re sauteeing our Spicy Shrimp (not boiling), I would recommend removing the shells from the shrimp before cooking. This allows the spice blend to truly flavor the part of the shrimp that we’ll be eating!

Some restaurants keep the tails on the shrimp, but this is purely for aesthetic purposes. If you’d like to remove the tails from the shrimp before cooking, this is definitely something that you can do!

Shrimp Dopeaja from the side

Can I Use Pre-Cooked Shrimp?

If that entire section just scared you and you’d prefer to use pre-cooked shrimp, you can do that as well. Your shrimp won’t need to cook nearly as long, just long enough to heat it up.

Instead of the 8-minute cook time mentioned in the recipe, you can shoot for a 3 minute cook time. This will be just enough to allow the shrimp to be coated in your delicious spice blend.

Maintain the secondary 8-10 minute cook time once the tomatoes have been added.

Substitutions for this Spicy Shrimp Recipe

The Dopeaja is best served over a bed of white rice. To keep this dish healthier, you can also serve the Spicy Shrimp by itself. If you’d like to cut the spicy with another element, serve it over vegetables.

If you make this recipe, post a photo of it on Facebook and tag @TheForeignFork or hashtag #TheForeignFork. I love to see what you make!! And don’t forget to leave a comment on this post with the hashtag #TheForeignFork and tag @TheForeignFork!

And if you liked this recipe, don’t forget to check out the other recipes that I’ve picked out just for you:

Shrimp Dopeaja
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Spicy Shrimp (Dopeaja) from Bangladesh

Spicy Shrimp (Dopeaja) is a dish from Bangladesh made by combining shrimp, onions, tomatoes, and spices to create a phenomenal 30-minute dinner. This dish is spicy and flavorful, and is best served over a bed of white rice.

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup canola oil
  • 1/2 inch ginger grated
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp ground red pepper
  • 2 tbsp pureed onion
  • 1 1/2 cup raw shrimp
  • 1/2 onion sliced
  • 1/2 cup water
  • sea salt to taste
  • 1 large tomato chopped
  • 1 bunch cilantro chopped
  • 1 bunch scallions chopped
  • white rice for serving

Instructions

  1. Heat the oil in the pan. Once heated, add the spices, the pureed onion, and a tbsp of water to the pan and let cook for about 4 minutes, until fragrant. 

  2. Add the raw shrimp and the onions to the pan and pour the 1/2 cup of water over it. Add the sea salt to taste. Cook covered on medium-high heat for about 8 minutes, then uncover the pan and allow about 3/4 of the water to evaporate out. 

  3.  When the water is almost gone, add the tomato, cilantro, and scallions. Cook for about 8-10 more minutes or until the oil begins to separate. 

  4. Serve over a bed of white rice and enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For personal or educational use only. 


Qutab (Azerbaijan): A Savory, Herb-Filled Crepe

Stack of Qutab crepes

Qutab is a savory crepe from Azerbaijan. The only qualifier to this dish is that the crepe must be filled with herbs. After that, creativity is welcome! Try different meats, cheeses, herbs, or spreads and discover your favorite Qutab combination.

Lookin’ for a little snack? A great appetizer? A light lunch that pairs perfectly with delicious soup? Look no further, my (wo)man! I gotchu covered right here.

These little snackers remind me of crepes, but crunchier. The batter is made of all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, oil and boiling water. It crisps up nicely to make a deliciously textured crust.

Overhead view of qutab on wooden board

Making the Crepe

When making the pancake portion of the Qutab, use a medium pan, and make sure to re-grease it with each new circle of dough added. Place the dough in the pan, and immediately begin filling the crepe with your desired filling. Leave the crepe to cook for about 30 seconds to one minute, until it starts to brown. Using a rubber spatula, fold the dough over to create a half moon shape. Continue cooking the Qutab until both outer sides have browned.

Stack of Qutab with herbs and yogurt dip

Filling Your Qutab

The freedom is yours from there! As long as the Qutab are filled with herbs, they’re considered a traditional Azerbaijani recipe.

I chose to fill my Qutab with mint, dill, cilantro, and chives, but you can also choose from sage, oregano, or any other herbs that catch your eye. Be sure to use a base of spinach! If you’d like meat in your crepe, ground lamb makes a great choice. Mix in paneer or feta for a cheesy addition, or add spreads to the cooked crepe, like pumpkin or molasses.

Get creative in the kitchen and see where it takes you! If you come up with a mind-blowing combo, share it with me!! If you liked this Qutab, I’m sure you’ll also live this Boolawnee from Afghanistan or this Zucchini Slice from Australia!

Qutab (Azerbaijan)

Qutab is a savory crepe from Azerbaijan. The only qualifier to this dish is that the crepe must be filled with herbs. After that, creativity is welcome! Try different meats, cheeses, herbs, or spreads and discover your favorite Qutab combination.

Ingredients

Crepe Dough

  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 cup wheat flour
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1.5-2 cups boiling water as needed

Filling

  • 2 cups spinach 1 bunch
  • ½ cup feta
  • 3 stalks chives
  • 2 tbsp mint
  • 2 tbsp dill
  • 1 tbsp Lemon juice
  • ¼ white onion
  • 2 tbsp cilantro
  • 2 tbsp yogurt
  • ¼-½ cup pumpkin depending on preference
  • 1/4 cup onion chopped

Instructions

Make the Dough

  1. Mix both types of flour together and add the salt. 

  2. Boil the water on the stove. Slowly pour the water into flour until you have a ball of dough that is wet and holds itself together but is not sticky. 

  3. Allow the dough to cool, then add the oil and knead the dough until soft. Cover and leave to rest for about half an hour.

Filling and Assembly

  1. In a medium pan, sauté the chopped onion and the chives together. 

  2. Once translucent, add the spinach and the lemon juice and sauté until wilted. Remove from the heat and add the rest of the filling ingredients except for the pumpkin. Stir to combine.

  3. Separate dough into quarters. Flour a surface and use a rolling pin to roll the dough into a circle, flouring as necessary. 

  4. Heat a cast iron skillet over medium heat. Drizzle the skillet with oil and lay the circle of dough on the skillet. 

  5. Spread pumpkin puree on one half of the dough and then layer 2 tbsp of filling on the dough. Fold the dough in half and press the edges together. 

  6. Cook until the dough becomes crispy and browned, then flip and cook the other side. Repeat until ingredients are gone. 

  7. Serve with plain yogurt as a dipping sauce on the side.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 

Dolma (Azerbaijan): A New Champion

Dolma with yogurt sauce

Dolma is an Azerbaijani dish made by stuffing grape leaves with lamb meat, rice, onion, and herbs like mint, dill, and cilantro! They are perfect served alone or with a delicious and authentic garlic yogurt dipping sauce. These dolma are almost guaranteed to be a family favorite!

I never thought that this day would come.

The second dish of Azerbaijan has arrived and… dare I say it?

This recipe might be the brand new winner of the title “Best Recipe Yet.”

Yeah, you heard me right. This dolma is, I’m pretty sure, the best recipe to have EVER been featured on The Foreign Fork.

Some Background

Mama Foreign Fork has an obsession with grape leaves. When my mom was growing up, her favorite neighbor was an older woman from Lebanon. On the weekends, the neighbor used to cook for my mom and share her favorite delicious Lebanese dishes, the best of which, my mother claims, were the grape leaves.

As I grew up, Mama Foreign Fork tried to encourage her reluctant and stubborn daughter (ahem, myself) to like grape leaves, but to no avail. As a child, I always thought they looked and tasted disgusting. I hadn’t tried grape leaves in a few years, so when I saw dolma on a list of Azerbaijani recipes, I knew I wanted to make them for my mother. But I was also fairly confident that I wasn’t going to like the recipe much myself. In fact, I put off making the dolma for quite a while because I didn’t want to spend so much time making a dish that I was going to “hate.”

But, as usually happens when I’m unsure about making a recipe for The Foreign Fork, I was proved wrong. Again.

Dolma horizontal

UMMM TRY THESE NOW

These dolma are Superb. Spectacular. Magnificent. Life-Changing. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. Someone give me a better adjective!

My cousins came to visit from Georgia, so I made these grape leaves as an appetizer for them to try. My recipe made 71 dolma… by the time 6 adults finished feasting, a mere 5 dolma remained. Now THAT, my dudes, is a recipe that I consider a success.

Dolma Variations

For those of you that are wondering how I ate these dolma while on the Whole30, I want to make it clear that I made these (and straight up devoured them) before my Whole30 actually began. HOWEVER. I have some good suggestions for ways to make these guys actually Whole30 compliant! Instead of rice, you can combine the meat and onions with artichokes, pine nuts, or matchstick carrots. Each will create a different but still delicious flavor for your dolma.

Want to see check out the recipe that reigned supreme as Best Recipe Yet for 11 whole countries?? Click here to see my Kabuli Pulao Recipe from Afghanistan!  Want to try these dolma out for yourself? Make sure to share a photo of your creations on Facebook or Instagram and tag @theforeignfork or hashtag #theforeignfork!

Dolma with yogurt sauce
5 from 1 vote
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Dolma (Azerbaijan)

Dolma is an Azerbaijani dish made by stuffing grape leaves with lamb meat, rice, onion, and herbs like mint, dill, and cilantro! They are perfect served alone or with a delicious and authentic garlic yogurt dipping sauce. These dolma are almost guaranteed to be a family favorite!

Ingredients

Stuffing

  • 1 pound ground lamb
  • 1 medium onion grated
  • ½ cup medium-grain white rice (such as basmati)
  • ½ cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
  • ½ cup finely chopped fresh dill
  • ½ cup finely chopped fresh mint
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper

Assembly

  • About 75 medium sized grape leaves jarred or canned
  • 3 tablespoons ghee or olive oil
  • Plain Yogurt or Garlicky yogurt sauce to serve

Instructions

  1. In a medium mixing bowl, combine the stuffing ingredients. Mix with your hand until well combined.

  2. If using canned leaves, put batches of them in a colander, rinse well under cold water to remove the salt, and drain. If the canned leaves feel too thick, blanch them in boiling water for about a minute, then drain. Otherwise, do not blanch. Cut off the stems.
  3. Arrange some of the damaged leaves flat on the bottom of the saucepan. If you don’t have damaged leaves, line the bottom of the saucepan with unused whole leaves to cover.

  4. Hold a leaf shiny side down on the palm of your hand. Place about 1 heaping teaspoon of the filling at the stem end of the leaf. Fold the top down, then the sides over the filling and roll up tightly to shape it into a 1-inch round bundle.

  5.  Arrange the stuffed leaves, seam side down, on the bottom of the pan. Continue until all the leaves and filling are used, arranging the stuffed bundles snugly together in the pan, making several layers.

  6. Dot the top with butter and pour in water to cover the dolma halfway. Place a small lid or a small ovenproof plate on top of the stuffed leaves to keep them tight and to prevent them from opening. Cover and bring to a boil.
  7. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for about 1 hour 30 minutes, or until the leaves are tender, the filling is cooked, and there is little liquid left (if the liquid is completely absorbed at some point during cooking, add more water and continue to simmer).
  8. Serve immediately with bread and plain yogurt or garlicky yogurt sauce to spoon onto the dolma to taste.
  9. Garlicky Yogurt Sauce: To make garlicky yogurt sauce, in a bowl, combine 1 cup or more plain yogurt with 2-4 cloves garlic, crushed with a garlic press.

Recipe Notes

Recipe from AZ Cookbook 

Mangal Salad: Roasted Vegetables from Azerbaijan

Roasted Mangal Salad

Mangal salad is a side dish from Azerbaijan made from broiled vegetables, including peppers, tomatoes, eggplants, and red onions. Serve this dish alongside some crusty, toasted bread for a spectacular appetizer, or bake with eggs for a delicious breakfast.

Mangal Salad

Hello hello and welcome to January! 2019! Woah, baby.

As 2019 starts, so does Azerbaijan! And we’re kickin’ this year off with a GREAT Azerbaijani side dish, called Mangal Salad. I am SUPER excited for this recipe because 1. It’s Amazing and 2. It’s Whole30 Compliant!

A January Whole30 and Thoughts on New Year’s Resolutions

Quick interjection: Whole30 is 30 days of cutting out everything that messes with digestion (ie: grains, dairy, legumes, alcohol, and processed sugar). After 30 days without these food groups, you slowly add them back in and see what foods work well with your body.

Yep, I admit it. I jumped on the Whole30 bandwagon for the first month of 2019. Funnily enough, I’m not really a huge “New Year’s Resolution” person. I believe that you can improve yourself or achieve your goals at any time of the year. You don’t need to wait for a new year to begin to do so. But also, a fresh, clean start is never a bad thing… And I wanted to curb those out of control sugar cravings I’ve been having. So here we are: No processed sugar for 30 days.

(As I type this, I have a chocolate pineapple upside down cake baking in the oven for a Post-New-Year-Family-Christmas-Party I’m going to today. Which I CANNOT EAT WHEN IT COMES OUT OF THE OVEN. Name a bigger form of torture. Oh wait. YOU CAN’T.)

This Mangal Salad is G-O-O-D

Anyways. If I’m going to be sad about not eating cake, this mangal salad softens the blow just a bit. It’s super simple to make, and absolutely scrumptious. Once it was done, I spread it on some toasted French bread and ooooh baby I was in heaven. I also baked some eggs into the mangal salad for breakfast, which was deeeeelish.

Leave the vegetables whole, and broil them in the oven until the skin is blackened and the flesh of the vegetables is sweet. Peel the skin off of the vegetables, chop them, and mix them together. Traditional mangal salad does not include mushrooms or almonds, but these additions definitely brought this side dish over the edge. Try it out!

If you like these veggies also try out this Fergese (tomatoes, peppers, and feta cheese) from Albania! If you make this recipe, post a photo of it and tag @theforeignfork or hashtag #theforeignfork!


Mangal Salad

Mangal salad is a side dish from Azerbaijan made from broiled vegetables, including peppers, tomatoes, eggplants, and red onions. Serve this dish alongside some crusty, toasted bread for a spectacular appetizer, or bake with eggs for a delicious breakfast. 

Course Appetizer
Cuisine azerbaijan
Cook Time 15 minutes
Chill time 30 minutes
Servings 6 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 tomatoes whole
  • 2 eggplants halved
  • 1 yellow bell pepper whole
  • 1/2 red onion sliced into rings
  • 8 oz container of sliced mushrooms
  • 1 tbsp garlic chopped
  • ½ bunch cilantro chopped
  • Olive oil
  • Kosher salt
  • Pepper
  • 1/2 tbsp Lawry’s seasoned salt (optional, not Whole30 compliant)
  • ½ cup slivered almonds
  • 1 tbsp ghee

Instructions

  1. Place tomatoes, pepper, red onion slices, and eggplant halves on a pan. Broil in the oven on high until the skin on the peppers and the eggplant starts to blacken and the flesh is sweet. Turn the vegetables over and continue cooking until the other side begins to blacken as well (the tomatoes should not blacken, but they should begin to shrivel a bit). 

  2. Remove vegetables from the oven and allow them to rest until they are cool enough to be handled. 

  3. In the meantime, coat the bottom of a medium pan with olive oil, and add the mushrooms. Season with salt, pepper, garlic powder, and Lawry’s to taste. Continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are soft. 

  4. In a separate, small pan, heat the ghee. Add the slivered almonds and stir over medium heat until they begin to toast. Remove from heat and set aside. 

  5. Once vegetables are cool, remove the peels from the eggplant and the tomatoes. Chop all of the vegetables and mix together, along with mushrooms, the toasted almonds, and the cilantro. 

  6. Allow the mixture to cool in the fridge for about a half an hour before serving. Serve as a side with meat or alongside toasted, crusty bread. Enjoy!