Rice Porridge Recipe

vertical rice porridge

This recipe for rice porridge is a common breakfast in the country of Chad. Making it reminds me of making oatmeal for breakfast, but instead of oats, white rice is used! I top my rice porridge with peanut butter, bananas, and brown sugar. 

This rice porridge is a great way to enjoy the beauty of another country while also using ingredients and techniques that are common in Western homes. 

It’s not that the ingredients, methods, or cooking styles used to make this dish are exotic or unique. The combination is simply something that I wouldn’t normally think to make without some prompting from Chad.   

This rice porridge is a traditional breakfast in Chad, and can be enjoyed many different ways. Peanut butter is fairly standard across the board– you’d be hard pressed to find a recipe for Bouillie (the name for rice porridge in Chad) without it. 

I typically eat my oatmeal with peanut butter and banana in the mornings, so I stuck with bananas. You can also choose to add strawberries or any other fruit of your choosing. 

close up of rice porridge

Can Rice Porridge be Reheated?

This recipe for rice porridge cooks up nice and creamy and thick. The longer you let your rice porridge cool, the thicker it begins to be. I would recommend eating your rice porridge fresh. If you do need to reheat it, add a bit of milk into the bowl/pot before warming. This will add some moisture back into the recipe. 

Is Rice Porridge Healthy? 

I would definitely say that this rice porridge is on the healthier side of breakfast foods, though this depends largely on what ingredients you choose to top your breakfast with. 

If you are trying to keep your rice porridge on the healthier side, I would recommend using no brown sugar and controlled portions of peanut butter. 

What Ingredients are in this Rice Porridge Recipe? 

Water
Long grain white rice 
Peanut butter
Whole wheat flour
Banana slices
Brown sugar 

For full ingredient measurements and instructions, visit the recipe card at the bottom of the page. 

horizontal photo of rice porridge

How to Cook Rice Porridge On the Stove

In a small pot, boil your water on the stove. 

Add rice into the pot and reduce the heat to a simmer. 

Cook rice for 8 minutes, uncovered. 

Mix flour with some extra water and add to the pot alongside the peanut butter. 

Cook, uncovered for 10 minutes, stirring frequently to ensure your rice doesn’t burn.

Top with more peanut butter, brown sugar, and bananas and enjoy! 

Did you like this breakfast recipe from Chad? Make sure to check out more Foreign Fork breakfast recipes by visiting the following pages: 

Rice Porridge

This rice porridge recipe from Chad is the perfect breakfast recipe! It is topped with brown sugar, peanut butter, and bananas.

Course Breakfast, Main Course, rice
Cuisine chad
Cook Time 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups water
  • ½ cup water extra
  • ½ cup rice
  • 2 tbsp peanut butter I used Jif
  • 2 tbsp whole wheat flour

Toppings

  • Peanut Butter
  • Banana slices
  • Brown sugar

Instructions

  1. In a small pot, boil you water on the stove.

  2. Add rice into the pot and reduce the heat to a simmer.

  3. Cook rice for 8 minutes, uncovered.

  4. Mix flour with some extra water and add to the pot alongside the peanut butter.

  5. Cook, uncovered, for 10 minutes, stirring frequently to ensure your rice doesn't burn.

  6. Top with more peanut butter, brown sugar, and bananas. Enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 

Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana Filling

Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana Filling are inspired by a few recipes I found online credited to the country Burundi. The batter is a snickerdoodle cookie dough batter, which is placed in a baking pan with layers of bananas and dates in between. The entire dessert is then sprinkled with butter, cinnamon, and sugar to create a rich and delicious dessert for anyone to enjoy!

The Tastemaker Conference in Portland, Oregon

Well, the time has come and passed. I’m sitting on my flight on the way home from Portland, Oregon right now. Which means that I just spent the week/weekend at the Tastemaker Conference here!

This conference was pretty much everything I could dream of. I  took incredible classes from absolute experts in my field, and got to ask questions that I have literally wondered the answers to since the day I hit publish on my first blog post.  My to do list of things to do to improve The Foreign Fork has grown x100, and, while I’m sad to be going home, I’m chomping at the bit to get started on all of the new things I’m excited to do.

Alexandria standing in front of a Tastemaker Sign in Portland
Me at the Tastemaker Conference 2019 in Portland, Oregon

Making Connections with Fellow Food Bloggers

Above all else, the best part of this conference was BY FAR meeting so many fellow food bloggers. Sometimes being a food blogger can be a little bit isolating… I mean, there aren’t many people in the world that care to talk about how to make a pot roast look good in a photo or how to word your article just right so that your Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana Filling show up first in Google’s search index.

But, luckily for me, this conference gave me so many connections I would never have had otherwise. Karli from Cooking with Karli, Alli from Longbourn Farm, Rebecca from Good Things Baking Co, and Terryn from Hot Pan Kitchen were the BEST roommates I could have asked for.

photo of shoes in front of a sign that says "I am a tastemaker"

Bloggers Turned Friends

Not only did we have fun blogging, we became actual, genuine friends. We had just as much fun exploring the rose garden of Portland (and eating literally every morsel of food that existed in Portland) as we did working silently side by side with each other. And this list doesn’t even include so many of the other incredible women and men that I met!

We shared tips and tricks, formed bonds with each other, and were genuinely sad when we had to leave…. But now I know that I have friends from around the country that have the same interests as myself.

Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars displayed on parchment

Okay, Now Let’s Get to the Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana Filling

So, Burundi was a tough one for me. There’s not much research done on the country of Burundi, and definitely not a lot of recipes or food posted…. I saw Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana filling from Burundi (also called Date and Banana Mix) on the internet a few times, BUT I will preface this by saying this:

Burundi is not known for having a lot of dessert. Quite frankly, I tried my hardest to find someone from Burundi so that I could ask them for help picking recipes (or confirming that the recipes I had picked were, in fact, Burundian), but to no avail. Electronic resources, book resources, finding people… none of them were super helpful to me about specific dishes from Burundi.

But whenever I saw these cookie bars they looked awesome. So, for the very first time I will tell you point blank: I’m not sure if these Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana Filling are truly from Burundi, but…. They’re delicious…. so I made them anyways.

Bowl of Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars

What are Dates?

Dates are the fruit that grows on a date palm tree. These trees typically grow in tropical regions, and when the fruit is fresh, it has a smooth skin. Most of the time, when dates are sold in America, they are dried.

Drying the dates makes them sweet and full of fiber and anti-oxidants. Honestly, I don’t really know what an anti-oxidant is, but I know that eating a date is yummy and it taste like dessert. Which is why they’re in these cookie bars!

How to Layer Your Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana Filling

Once you make the dough for the Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana Filling, you’re going to layer them in the pan. First, place down a small layer of dough… JUST enough to cover the bottom of the pan with a tin layer. Then add the dates and bananas over the top of this cookie mixture.

Next, add a thicker layer of cookie dough over the top of the dates and bananas. There is just enough cookie dough in this recipe to cover the layers both times but not much left over. Doing a thin layer on the bottom preserves extra cookie dough to make covering the dates and bananas with the second layer easier. It’s hard to have pretty Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana Filling if you don’t have enough dough to cover the top layer of the dates and bananas.

Close up of snickerdoodle cookie bars

The Secret Ingredient for Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana Filling

The very best part of these Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars is the cinnamon sugar topping on the bars <3. To really send these cookie bars over the edge, make sure to brush melted butter over the pan before sprinkling the cinnamon sugar. Oh boy, I can already feel myself melting into the goodness.

Did you like these Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana Filling? Then make sure to also check out my recipe for Alfajores from Argentina, these Tahini Cookies from Armenia, and ESPECIALLY these Maamoul Cookies with Date Filling from Bahrain. And if you made this recipe, don’t forget to take a photo and share on Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #TheForeignFork and tag @TheForeignFork. Thanks for stopping by, everyone! I’ll see you all very soon.

Bowl of Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars
5 from 1 vote
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Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana Filling

Snickerdoodle Cookie Bars with Banana Filling are inspired by
a few recipes I found online credited to the country Burundi. The batter is a
snickerdoodle cookie dough batter, which is placed in a baking pan with layers
of bananas and dates in between. The entire dessert is then sprinkled with
butter, cinnamon, and sugar to create a rich and delicious dessert for anyone
to enjoy!

Course Dessert
Cuisine Burundi
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Author The Foreign Fork

Ingredients

  • 1 stick butter softened
  • 2 tbsp butter melted
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 bananas sliced into rounds
  • 1 cup dates chopped
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • ¼ tsp cinnamon

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line an 8×8 glass pan with parchment paper.
  2. In a large bowl, use an electric mixer to beat together the butter and the sugar until fluffy.
  3. Add eggs one at a time, mixing briefly between each addition.
  4. Use a wooden spoon to hand mix in the flour, salt, and baking powder.
  5. Spread a little less than half of the mixture in the pan on the parchment paper.
  6. Spread bananas slices over the dough.
  7. Spread chopped dates over the bananas.
  8. Spread the other half of the dough over the bananas and dates, using your fingers to make sure it covers the entire surface. You may need to (very lightlwet your fingers with water to keep the dough from sticking to them.
  9. Bake in the oven for about 30-35 minutes.
  10. In a small bowl, mix together the cinnamon and sugar.
  11. When the dessert comes out of the oven, brush the top with 2 tbsp melted butter and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar.
  12. Wait for the bars to cool, then cut them into 9-12 squares and enjoy!
  13. Leave a review on this recipe letting me know what you thought!

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 

Recipe inspired by 196 Flavors, though the measurements are different.

Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Sauce from Benin

caramelized-bananas

Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Sauce are a spectacular dessert from Benin. They can be enjoyed solo, but my favorite way to devour them is on top of chocolate ice cream. The original concept for this Beninese classic is to caramelize the bananas in orange juice, but I put a special spin on the recipe. Let me know in the comments below what you think!

It’s May, and it’s officially spring, and although the sky seems to forget it sometimes, its supposed to be warm out. Michigan, of course, doesn’t always follow the rules. But warm is how it’s supposed to be, if everything goes as planned.

If everything goes as planned, then also, ice cream season is just around the corner. Okay, okay, if you’re anything like me… ice cream season is EVERY season. There are some crazies out there that only like to eat ice cream when it’s warm out. I can’t relate to those people, but I have some good news for them:

caramelized bananas with ice cream scoop

Caramelized Bananas as An Ice Cream Topping

These Beninese Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Juice are THE BEST ICE CREAM TOPPINGS EVER. No exaggeration.

Sorry for screaming at you, but I needed you to understand. You get it now, right? Best. Topping. Ever.

How to Make Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Juice

Pineapple juice and brown sugar mix together and heat on the stove to create a delicious sauce. Then, right before it’s done, add the bananas in and caramelize them right up. If you have a sweet tooth, this is the treat for you. I chose Dole Pineapple Juice as my pineapple juice of choice!

Caramelized bananas with cast iron

Orange Juice vs Pineapple Juice

The traditional method for this treat in Benin is actually caramelized bananas in orange sauce. You’re welcome to make this recipe with whatever fruit juice you’d prefer, and the same ratios should work just fine. Use fresh squeezed orange juice to be traditional, pineapple juice to be like me, or go off the rails and try something else! You’re going to like it no matter what. 

caramelized bananas in a bowl

Boiling Your Brown Sugar

Brown sugar syrup is a little difficult to master on the stove. If you let this syrup boil for too long (like I did the first time), the brown sugar will harden into almost a candy… Then the bananas will be caught in a sweet, sugary casing, and harden onto the ice cream… not ideal.

spoonful of caramelized bananas

Make sure to pay attention that your brown sugar boils the right way. You’ll want it to simmer very low for about 15 minutes and then plop the bananas in just to warm them through. Any longer and they won’t be as enjoyable.

If you tried these Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Juice and loved them, post a photo on Facebook or Instagram and tag @TheForeignFork or hashtag #TheForeignFork! Leave a comment telling me how they were! If you liked this recipe, make sure to also check out this Strawberry Kissel from Belarus or these Tropical Stuffed Avocados from Barbados.

caramelized bananas with ice cream scoop
5 from 1 vote
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Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Sauce

Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Sauce are a spectacular dessert from Benin. They can be enjoyed solo, but my favorite way to devour them is on top of chocolate ice cream. The original concept for this Beninese classic is to caramelize the bananas in orange juice, but I put a special spin on the recipe. Let me know in the comments below what you think!

Course Dessert
Cuisine benin
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings 2 servingss

Ingredients

  • 2 large bananas
  • 1 6 oz can Dole Pineapple juice
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • ¼ tsp vanilla

Instructions

  1. Put all ingredients besides bananas in the pan. Simmer for 15 minutes.
  2. Peel bananas and slice in half vertically. Add bananas into the sauce and cook for another 2 minutes, until the bananas are warmed through

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only.

Banana Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting from Belize

Banana Cake from Belize

This is my very favorite banana cake recipe, complete with an incredible cream cheese frosting. Flavored with a (perfect) overload of bananas, cinnamon, and buttermilk, this banana cake is almost like a combination of cake and banana bread. And boy, oh boy, are you gonna want to try it.

I eat, on average, probably about 6 bananas a week. It’s very rare for me to start a work day without a banana for breakfast, and when I’m hungry and craving something sweet on the weekends, a banana and peanut butter is my snack of choice. Bananas are a gift from the Good Lord… truly. They’re perfect portable snacks, complete with their own all-natural packaging! Nature is genius, I tell ya.

Banana Cake in America vs. Belize

Because of my love for bananas, I obviously love all banana baked goods as well. Banana bread… or banana muffins… can’t forget about banana cake. God, I love banana cake. And I especially love this treat when it comes with cream cheese frosting.

Banana cake is a little different in America than it is in Belize. In America, this treat is more of a cake-y texture; It’s light and fluffy. This texture is achieved by adding only a few bananas and quite a bit of flour to the recipe. The less bananas in the recipe, the less moisture in the batter, and the fluffier the cake!

Belizean Banana Cake

In Belize, the recipe is very different. Most recipes that I found for the Belizean version had around 6 bananas in the recipe, and not very much flour. Belizean banana cake is very dense, even denser than banana bread! It’s flat and moist and the banana taste is very prominent!

Both have their perks, right? I love a good light, fluffy cake, but I also love a great banana flavor. So naturally, I took the middle route. My banana cake had four bananas in the recipe, making it lighter than the Belizean version but still with the great banana flavor! The texture is comparable to a banana bread, but in a sheet form.

The Cream Cheese Frosting

And the cream cheese frosting….. Oooooh baby that cream cheese frosting makes all the difference in the world. I got the frosting recipe from my very favorite source: Sally’s Baking Addiction. It’s fluffy and creamy and honestly, the best part of any recipe that its a part of.

Have I convinced you to try it yet? YES?!?!? Oh good. Because the recipe is posted below. When you try it, post a photo on Facebook and Instagram so that I can see (make sure to tag @TheForeignFork or hashtag #TheForeignFork). And leave a comment, as always, so that I know how it was. Don’t forget to tune in on Sunday for a GREAT Belizean street food recipe, garnaches.

Banana Cake from Belize
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Banana Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting (Belize)

This is my very favorite banana cake recipe flavored with a (perfect) overload of bananas and cinnamon and an indescribable cream cheese frosting.

Course Dessert
Cuisine Belize
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 18 servings

Ingredients

For the Cake:

  • 4 large ripe bananas
  • 8 tbs 1 stick margarine or butter, melted
  • 2 eggs beaten
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 ½ cup buttermilk
  • 2 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/8 tsp salt

For the Frosting:

  • 8 oz full fat cream cheese, softened to room temperature
  • 1 stick unsalted butter softened to room temperature
  • 3 cups powdered sugar
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • tsp salt

Instructions

Make the Cake:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a large bowl, mash the bananas. Stir in melted butter.
  3. Use an electric mixer to add eggs, brown sugar, granulated sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, and buttermilk.
  4. In a separate bowl, combine flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.
  5. Add dry mixture into the wet mixture, and mix until combined and then for 1 ½ minutes.
  6. Grease a 9×13 pan and pour the batter into the pan. Bake for 30 minutes, remove from oven and cover top with aluminum foil. Continue baking for another 20 minutes.

Make the Frosting:

  1. In a large bowl, use an electric mixer to cream together butter and cream cheese on high speed until smooth and creamy.
  2. Add in 3 cups powdered sugar, vanilla, and salt. Beat on low speed for 30 seconds to combine, then switch to high speed and beat for two minutes.
  3. Once the cake is cooled, spread the frosting on the cake, top with banana slices, and enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Cake recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only.

 

Frosting recipe comes from Sally’s Baking Addiction