Canada-Themed Date Night Ideas

A Canada-Themed Date Night

If you’re looking for a unique date night idea, maybe try a Canada-themed date night! As Canada’s Southern neighbor here in America, I don’t often think about Canada as an exotic place to visit. However, Canada is a truly easy place to love. The landscape is incredible, the food is delicious, and the people are so dang nice!  

It takes about 45 minutes for me to cross the border into Canada, but most people in the USA probably aren’t so lucky. If you want to experience the wonders of Canada, but can’t afford the money or the time that it takes to plan a trip, have no fear.


I’ve put together a great itinerary of a fun, Canada-themed date night so that you can experience all of the best parts of Canada from home. 

What to Make For Dinner: Canadian Poutine and Split Pea Soup

split pea soup from canada

This meal time is especially perfect for a cozy fall or winter evening at home. Actually, that’s the perfect time of year to plan your Canada-themed date night, because Canada often experiences large amounts of chilly weather due to how far north it is! 

Canadian Poutine is just…. Heaven. The recipe calls for crispy twice-fried french fries, and then the fries are slathered in gravy and topped with cheese curds. Poutine is on most restaurant menus in Canada, probably because it’s just straight up delicious. 

Split Pea Soup with Ham is my favorite soup I’ve ever made on the blog (and I’ve made so many soups from all over the world). This recipe is easy to make no matter what, but cooking the soup in the instant pot suddenly makes everything easier. And quicker! The split pea soup is thick and creamy and absolutely delicious. Plus, it’s a great main dish to go along with crunchy fries. 

What to Eat for Dessert: Fast and Easy Maple Cookies

Maple cookies from Canada

I am more proud of this recipe than I am of any other recipe on The Foreign Fork. These cookies are… just wow. They’re soft and chewy and sweet. But most importantly, they display the very best part of Canadian food culture: maple. 

Canadians love their maple flavors, but it’s no surprise why! These cookies are the perfect way to try a typical Canadian flavor that you’re going to love forever.  

What to Drink: Caesar 

poutine from canada

A caesar is Canada’s national cocktail. But almost no one has heard of it except for those within Canadian borders! A caesar is very similar to a bloody mary, but instead of tomato juice, they use Clamato juice (reconstituted tomato juice concentrate with sugar). 

There is even a day on the Canadian calendar dedicated to their favorite cocktail. But you don’t need to wait until May 18th to try this signature caesar recipe. Just click the link above and make it for Canadian date night. 

What to Listen To: This Canadian Playlist

This playlist features some of the most popular songs by some of the most famous Canadian artists. You could also listen to Celine Dione, Justin Bieber, Alanis Morissette, Avril Lavigne, Michael Buble, Shania Twain, Drake, etc. 

What to Watch: One Week

In the movie One Week, an engaged couple live in Canada. The man decides he needs an adventure before his marriage, and he rents a motorcycle and drives it across Canada.


I chose this movie because it showed the most beautiful parts of Canada. It allows you to really feel like you’re experiencing this country! Plus, it’s a beautiful story about the impact that a journey can have on the traveller, which is a concept near and dear to my heart. 

What to Play: Trivial Pursuit and Table Hockey 

It’s no secret that Canadians are obsessed with hockey. You may not be able to go play a game of pick up hockey with your honey on date night, but you can play a game of table hockey. Maybe you go to a local bar/arcade and play a game. Whatever you choose, make sure that you make your paddles “fight” at least once. It’s not a game of hockey without it. 

If you’re looking for a more laid-back approach, you can play a game of trivial pursuit! Trivial pursuit was invented by Canadian, Scott Abbot. This game can be played with as little as two players, so it’s perfect for experiencing the fun of Canada. 

And there you have it, folks. What to eat, what to drink, what to watch, what to play, what to listen to during a date night “in Canada”. Did you like experiencing what date night would be like in another country? If you liked this post, you’ll also like my Belgian date night post. Let me know what country you want me to make date night for next. Thanks!

Canadian Christmas Fruit Cake

Vertical christmas fruit cake

This Christmas Fruit Cake is a wonderful staple in the homes of Canadians during some of their most special days. Packed with dried fruits such as pineapples, cherries, raisins and dates, mixed with pecans and soaked in rum, this recipe tastes unique and delicious. Try it with a cup of tea!

She’s back, ladies and gents!! Aunt Lori is back in the Foreign Fork kitchen today, and she is going to be teaching us how to make traditional Canadian Christmas Fruit Cake. 

Christmas Fruit Cake in Canada is a long-standing tradition in the country. The fun part? The country is hugely divided on it. Many love the fruit cake and the nostalgia that it brings, while others can’t even get themselves to taste it. Still, though, Christmas fruit cake is a must in the homes of many Canadians during the holiday season. 

Aunt Lori’s recipe for Canadian fruit cake features candied cherries, candied pineapple, various other candied fruits, and pecans. The cake is cooked with a water bath so as to keep the dough moist and delicious. 

horizontal christmas fruit cake

Wedding Traditions

Not only is this recipe a great holiday treat, it’s also a Canadian wedding tradition! In Canada, many couples will pass out fruit cake to their guests. They will ask their guests to sleep with the cake under their pillow that night as a token of good luck for the new couple. 

On the couple’s one year wedding anniversary, they will normally eat a slice of their wedding fruit cake in celebration! 

What is In this Canadian Christmas Fruit Cake? 

Butter or margarine
Lemon juice 
Baking powder
Eggs
Granulated sugar
Flour
Seeded raisins
Dates
Mixed candied fruit
Candied cherries (red and green) 
Candied pineapple
Chopped pecans

How Do I Make Canadian Christmas Fruit Cake? 

Rinse the candied fruit with water. Then soak the fruit in rum overnight to remove the stickiness and rehydrate. 

Mix all of the dried fruit in a bowl. Sift one cup of reserved flour over fruit and mix until all of the fruit is coated in flour. 

In a separate, VERY large bowl, cream together butter and eggs. 

Add the lemon juice and beat again. 

Add sugar, flour, and baking powder and beat until creamy and smooth.

Mix all fruit and nuts into the batter by hand. 

Line wax paper into two 10.5”x5” loaf pans and 4 individual loaf pans and divide the batter among them.

Fill a 9×13 pan with water and place it in the bottom of the oven as a “water bath” for the cakes. 

Put the cakes in the oven and bake at 250 degrees for about 2.5 hours, or until a toothpick is removed clean.

Christmas Fruit Cake Pinterest Graphic

How to Store Christmas Fruit Cake

It is vital to know how to store your Christmas fruit cake properly, because it is almost NEVER eaten the same day that it is made. Typically, Christmas fruit cake “ripens” for at least a month before consumption, but some people choose to let their cake rest for up to four months.

To correctly store the Christmas fruit cake, first wrap it very tightly in wax paper. Then, wrap that in aluminum foil, making certain that there are no holes or air pockets.

Keep the cake in your fridge for the desired amount of time. The longer you “ripen” the cake, the more flavor it will have when you finally eat it!

horizontal christmas fruit cake

Christmas Fruit Cake with Rum

You can choose to store your Christmas fruit cake with the process I described above, OR you could take the entire process a step further with “feeding” your cake. 

During the process of feeding your Christmas cake, you periodically soak the cake with more rum (or your alcohol of choice). When it comes time to eat your cake, it will taste distinctly of rum! This process normally takes about a month, but can extend for up to 3 months. 

To begin, first wrap your cake in a rum-soaked cheesecloth. Then follow the previously mentioned steps of wrapping it next in wax paper and, finally, in aluminum foil. Continue to store it in the fridge between “feeding” sessions. 

Every week, remove the cake from the fridge and unwrap. Use a skewer to poke holes into the top of the cake about every two inches. The holes should extend halfway down into the cake.

Use a spoon to scoop rum and pour into each hole of the cake. Before re-wrapping, use a pastry brush to brush the remaining rum into the surface of the cake. Rewrap and place in the fridge again. 


Continue this process until the Christmas fruit cake is ready for consumption. As aforementioned, this process can last anywhere from 1-3 months, depending on how strongly you would like your cake to taste of rum.

overhead christmas fruit cake

Why is My Christmas Fruit Cake Crumbly? 

If your Christmas fruit cake is crumbly, you most likely didn’t add enough moisture into the batter/cooking process. Luckily, this recipe is designed to keep your cake beautifully moist. 


First, soaking the fruit in the rum overnight rehydrates it. This means that the cake will not need to pull moisture from the fruit!

Secondly, the water bath ensures that your cake recipe is surrounded by moisture while cooking, therefore keeping your cake wonderfully moist as well. 

If you liked this Christmas fruit cake recipe, be sure to check out these other great dessert recipes as well!:

Christmas Fruit Cake

This Christmas Fruit Cake is a wonderful staple in the homes of Canadians during some of their most special days. Packed with dried fruits such as pineapples, cherries, raisins and dates, mixed with pecans and soaked in rum, its taste is unique and delicious. Try it with a cup of tea!

Course baking, Dessert
Cuisine canada, canadian
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours 30 minutes
Servings 2 large cakes, 4 individual loaves

Ingredients

Batter Ingredients

  • 1 lb butter or margarine softened
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 10 eggs beaten lightly
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 4 cups flour leave one cup reserved

Mix-Ins

  • 2 lbs seeded raisins
  • 2 lbs dates
  • 1 lb mixed candied fruit
  • 1 lb candied cherries red and green
  • ½ lb candied pineapple chopped in slices
  • ½ lb chopped pecans

Instructions

  1. Rinse the candied fruit with water. Then soak the fruit in rum overnight to remove the stickiness and rehydrate.
  2. Mix all of the dried fruit in a bowl. Sift one cup of reserved flour over fruit and mix until all of the fruit is coated in flour.
  3. In a separate, VERY large bowl, cream together butter and eggs.
  4. Add the lemon juice and beat again.
  5. Add sugar, flour, and baking powder and beat until creamy and smooth.
  6. Add all fruit and nuts into the batter and combine by hand.
  7. Line wax paper into two 10.5”x5” loaf pans and 4 individual loaf pans and divide the batter among them.
  8. Fill a 9×13 pan with water and place it in the bottom of the oven as a “water bath” for the cakes.
  9. Put the cakes in the oven and bake at 250 degrees for about 2.5 hours, or until a toothpick is removed clean.

Peameal Bacon Sandwich

Close up vertical of peameal bacon breakfast sandwich

This Peameal Bacon Sandwich is the best ever breakfast sandwich! It features Canadian Bacon caramelized in real maple syrup, topped with an egg, cheese, avocado, and mayonnaise. Need I say more?

In September of 2018, I drove the four hours from Detroit, Michigan to Toronto, Ontario for a weekend trip with a friend. As a solo traveler and a social spirit, I had the perfect set up: A day in the city by myself before my friend arrived to fill with whatever solo activities my heart desired. 

Naturally, I spent the week leading up to the trip researching the best things to do in Toronto, and, in typical Alexandria fashion, the best food to eat. One particular foodie pleasure graced the pages of many a google search result…  so much so, that it immediately found itself at the top of my list as well:

The Peameal Bacon Sandwich from Carousel Bakery in the St. Lawrence Market. 

Would any of you be surprised if I told you that the main reason that I chose to put this particular food on my menu is because Anthony Bourdain told me to? Probably not… 

Bourdain visited Toronto to film an episode of his show The Layover, where he took a moment to grace the Carousel Bakery Peameal Bacon Sandwich with one simple phrase: “accept no substitute.” Don’t worry, Bourdain, I didn’t. 

full sandwich

What is Peameal Bacon?

Peameal Bacon is pork loin that is cured and rolled in cornmeal. Normally it is served in Ontario, and is what us in America call “Canadian bacon.” The peameal bacon is sold raw, and, in this recipe, is cooked on the stovetop. 

How to Fry Peameal Bacon

What makes this Peameal Bacon Breakfast Sandwich truly special is the way that the Peameal Bacon is cooked on the stove. This is Canada, right? Which means that our breakfast sandwich needs to have a little bit of syrup…

The Peameal bacon is sliced and cooked in a pan on the stovetop. About 3 minutes before it reaches the desired internal temperature, add a bit of maple syrup into the pan. The syrup will caramelize onto the bacon infusing it with a dynamic, enticing, sweet and savory taste.  

horizontal peameal bacon breakfast sandwich

At What Temperature is Peameal Bacon Cooked?

Peameal bacon needs to reach an internal temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit in order to reach a level of wellness safe for consumption. 

What is On this Peameal Bacon Sandwich? 

Avocado 
Brioche bun 
Cheddar Cheese 
Egg
Peameal bacon 
Maple syrup 
Mayonnaise 

For full list of ingredients and instructions, see recipe card below. 

close up of peameal bacon sandwich

How to Make this Best Ever Breakfast Sandwich

Cook the peameal bacon in maple syrup according to instructions above. 

Cook an egg over-easy and top with cheese.

Butter the bun on each side and grill on a griddle or in a skillet until toasted. 

Cut the avocado into slices and place on the bottom bun. 

Add Peameal bacon

Add egg covered in cheese. 

Spread mayonnaise on the top bun and place bun on sandwich. Use a toothpick to hold the sandwich together while you eat!

If you liked this recipe, you might also like: 

pinterest image for peameal bacon sandwhich

Peameal Bacon Sandwich

This Peameal Bacon Sandwich is the best ever breakfast sandwich! It features Canadian Bacon caramelized in real maple syrup, topped with an egg, cheese, avocado, and mayonnaise. Need I say more?

Course Breakfast, dinner, eggs, lunch
Cuisine breakfast for dinner, canadian
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings 1 serving

Ingredients

  • 1 Slice Peameal bacon
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • Egg
  • Slice of cheddar
  • Large brioche bun
  • ½ of an avocado
  • Mayonnaise

Instructions

  1. Cut a large piece of peameal bacon into thin slices.
  2. In a small skillet, sizzle peameal bacon over medium heat, until cooked through and reaches 145 degrees internally. About 3 minutes before the bacon is ready, add the maple syrup into the skillet and allow it to caramelize on the outside of the pork.
  3. In a separate skillet, cook an egg over-easy. When you flip the egg, remove it from the heat, add a slice of cheddar cheese to the top of the egg, and cover with a lid. Allow the egg to cook until it reaches the desired wellness and cheese is melted.
  4. Butter the bun on each side and grill on a griddle or in a skillet until toasted.
  5. Assemble:
  6. Cut the avocado into slices and place on the bottom bun.
  7. Then add Peameal bacon
  8. Then add egg covered in cheese.
  9. Spread mayonnaise on the top bun and place bun on sandwich. Use a toothpick to hold the sandwich together while you eat!
  10. Enjoy. Leave a comment on this post letting me know what you thought of the recipe!

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 

Split Pea Soup in an Instant Pot

Close up of Split pea Soup

This split pea soup in an instant pot is a quick, 30-minute meal that is filling and DELICIOUS. Throw all of your ingredients in the Instant Pot and soon enough you’ll have steaming bowls of soup to feed the whole family!

So guys, I learned something about myself in the last few weeks. Apparently I’m a fiend for split pea soup?? Weird, right? I never woulda thought. But that’s it… that’s the truth. 

I made this Split Pea Soup in an Instant Pot and I am OBSESSED. Seriously! Not only is this soup delicious, it also is SO hands off and easy to make…. You can have dinner ready and on the table in 30 minutes with this soup. And not only that, you’re going to want to make it as often as possible for the simple fact that it’s just so darn good! 

Split Pea Soup two bowls

Getting Used to my Instant Pot

I’ll admit, my pressure cooker scared me a little bit when I first got started with it. Truth be told, I couldn’t even figure out how to put the lid on for a solid like… 6 months.

But now that I’ve made this soup in my pressure cooker (and figured out how to put the lid on the pot), I am so ready to start exploring with other Instant Pot Recipes! This is a great lead-in for instant pot newbies 🙂

What Ingredients are in this Split Pea Soup in an Instant Pot?

Carrots 
Celery stalk 
Onion 
Butter
Ham 
Dry split peas
Chicken stock 
Bay leaves
Thyme leaves 

For full ingredients and instructions, see the recipe card at the bottom of the page. 

Spoonful of split pea soup

How to Make my Split Pea Soup in an Instant Pot

Set your instant pot to the saute setting. Heat your butter, and then saute your celery, carrots, and onions for about 5-7 minutes until the vegetables begin to soften. 

Add the peas, chicken stock, ham, bay leaves, and thyme leaves into the pot. 

Set your instant pot to high for 15 minutes.

Allow the pressure to release naturally for about 10 minutes, and then do an instant release after. 

Split pea soup with instant pot

How do I Reheat Split Pea Soup? 

This split pea soup is a great meal to make ahead of time, as it reheats wonderfully, as long as you follow a few easy tips:

As your split pea soup cools, it will begin to thicken. Once it’s been in your fridge overnight your soup will almost begin to seem gelatinous, as it will be harder to stir. It might even be a less pleasant texture to eat. 


The way to combat this is simple… scoop yourself a bowl of soup. Before you put it in the microwave or in a pot on the stovetop, add about 2 tbsp of chicken broth per serving (or more if necessary). This will thin out the soup a bit, bringing it back to the texture that it was when you first enjoyed it! 

If you liked this recipe, make sure to check out some of the other BEST soup recipes on my site: 

If you make this recipe, please leave a comment and let me know what you think! I’ll see you all soon for more Canadian classics! 

split pea soup pinterest graphic
Close up of Split pea Soup
5 from 1 vote
Print

Split Pea Soup in the Instant Pot

This split pea soup in an instant pot is a quick, 30-minute meal that is filling and DELICIOUS. Throw all of your ingredients in the Instant Pot and soon enough you'll have steaming bowls of soup to feed the whole family!

Course instant pot, Soup
Cuisine canada, Instant pot

Ingredients

  • 2 Carrots chopped
  • 1 Celery stalk chopped
  • 1 onion chopped
  • 3 tbsp Butter
  • 1 lb ham cubed
  • 1 lb dry split peas
  • 5 cups chicken stock
  • 4 Bay leaves
  • 3 Thyme sprigs

Instructions

  1. Set your instant pot to the saute setting. Heat your butter, and then saute your celery, carrots, and onions for about 5-7 minutes until the vegetables begin to soften.
  2. Add the peas, chicken stock, ham, bay leaves, and thyme leaves into the pot.
  3. Set your instant pot to high for 15 minutes.
  4. Allow the pressure to release naturally for about 10 minutes, and then do an instant release after.
  5. Enjoy! Leave a comment on this post letting me know what you thought.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 


Canadian Poutine Recipe

Poutine plate from afar

Ah, Canadian Poutine. The Canadians’ most delightful invention for the perfect, stumbling-home-from-the-bar-need-a-greasy-snack treat. Poutine features crunchy french fries soaked in brown gravy and then topped with cheese curds. Can you imagine anything more perfect?

What first began as a menu item on one restaurant’s offerings near Drummondville, Quebec in the 1950s has quickly become a staple across Canadian cuisine. 

I don’t know about you, but as someone that lives in the United States (and VERY close to Canada), I know a little bit about Poutine. At least Michigan– and I suspect most states in the USA– is no stranger to Canadian Poutine being on the bar appetizer menu. 

Where Was Poutine Invented? What Does Poutine Mean? 

There is much debate over the true origins of Poutine? Was Poutine invented in 1957 at L’Idéal in Warwick, Quebec? One customer in a rush asked the restaurant to throw each of his separate menu items– cheese curds and fries– together in the same to go bag. When he opened the bag and peered inside, the customer allegedly exclaimed that his to go order was “poutine!” meaning “a mess”. 

Perhaps, instead, poutine can be credited to Jean-Paul Roy, the owner of the restaurant Le Roy Jucep. Roy noticed that his customers would often combine the french fries, gravy and cheese curds that he sold separately into one large meal. Eventually, he put the combination on his menu…. And later patented the idea. 

close up of poutine fork

When did Poutine Become Popular in Canada? 

Poutine became popular in Canada shortly after its invention, but for quite some time, the dish wasn’t called “poutine”. The mixture of fries with cheese curds was called “mixte” for quite some time. Once larger restaurant chains started selling the dish, its name transformed. 

Now, poutine has become so popular in Canada that it is the country’s national dish. McDonalds and Burger King even sell their own versions of the infamous Canadian treat.

Different regions of Canada feature their own versions of Canadian poutine. For example, Newfoundland will also serve a dish called “poutine”, but instead of cheese curds, the dish will feature “dressing” or “stuffing”. 

Poutine on white background

Are Canadian Poutine and Disco Fries the Same? 

At first glance, it seems to be so. In fact, Disco Fries are New Jersey’s answer to the infamous Canadian poutine. However, there is one glaring difference between the two: 

While Canadian Poutine features fries, gravy, and cheese curds, disco fries features fries, gravy, and cheese sauce. (Here is a recipe for Jersey Diner-Style Disco Fries from Parsnips and Pastries).

You know what? That doesn’t sound the same to me at all 😉 

Seriously, though, Canadians take their cheese curds seriously, and for good reason! A poutine without cheese curds is not a poutine at all. 

Cheese Curds for Your Canadian Poutine

One of the most important tips that I received from my Canadian friends about making Canadian poutine is to look for high quality cheese curds. Your curds should squeak when you bite into them! If they don’t they’re not high quality enough curds. 

Don’t judge me, but my curds didn’t squeak….. Oops… 

Canadian poutine close up

What is Poutine Gravy Made Of? 

Olive Oil
Beef chuck
Butter 
Beef broth 
Onion
Flour 
Salt 
Black pepper

What Else Do I Need to Make Poutine? 

Cheese Curds
Idaho Potatoes
Sunflower Oil 

For full measurements and instructions, see the recipe card below. 

How to Make Canadian Poutine

Follow my recipe for how to make the BEST crunchy fries (inspired by Belgium). 

Heat oil in pan. Stir beef chuck 5-7 minutes until beef begins to brown. 

Add butter. Reduce heat to medium and stir until it melts.

Add diced onion, salt, black pepper

Wait until onion browns. 

Add flour for roux and whisk. Let sit for 3 minutes. 

Add the beef broth. 

Turn your heat to high so your gravy can hit a simmer

Cook for 15-20 minutes uncovered, depending on the consistency you’d like your gravy to reach

Top fries with gravy and cheese curds and enjoy  

I hope you enjoy this recipe! If you do, don’t forget to leave a comment on my post letting me know. And if you did like it, make sure to check out these other recipes that you might also like: 

Canadian Poutine Recipe

Ingredients

Poutine Gravy

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 lb. beef chuck chopped into tiny bits
  • 5 tbsp butter
  • 1 quart Beef broth
  • 1 Onion chopped
  • 3 tbsp Flour
  • 3/4 tsp Salt
  • Fresh ground Black pepper to taste

Poutine Fries

  • 5 Idaho Potatoes
  • 1 Container Sunflower Oil for deep frying
  • Sea Salt

Assembly

  • Cheese curds

Instructions

Poutine Gravy

  1. Heat a tbsp of olive oil in pan. Stir beef chuck 5-7 minutes until beef begins to brown.
  2. Add butter. Reduce heat to medium and stir until it melts.
  3. Add diced onion, salt, and black pepper. Continue stirring until the onion browns.
  4. Add flour for roux and whisk to combine. Let sit for 3 minutes.
  5. Add the beef broth and turn the heat to high so that the gravy reaches a simmer.
  6. Allow to simmer for 15-20 minutes, uncovered depending on the desired consistency.

Poutine Fries

  1. Peel potatoes and cut into fry shapes (about ½ inch thick and 4 inches long).
  2. Fill a bowl with water and add the raw potatoes. Let sit for a few minutes until the water becomes cloudy, empty the bowl, refill with fresh water, and put the raw potato fries back in. Continue until the water remains clear.
  3. In a large pot, heat oil to 325 degrees. Add the potatoes (about ¼ at a time) and fry for about 4-5 minutes.
  4. Remove from the oil and let drain on paper towel. Ensure that oil comes back to 325 degrees before adding your next round of fries.
  5. Allow the potatoes to cool completely– for at least a half an hour. When the potatoes are completely cooled, reheat the oil to 375 degrees.
  6. Sprinkle salt on the potatoes. Put them in the oil again, this time frying to your liking (about 3-6 minutes).
  7. Remove, drain, and salt again.

Assembly

  1. On a plate, layer the fries, a spoonful of poutine gravy and your cheese curds. Enjoy!
  2. Leave a comment on this page letting me know what you think!

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational and personal use only. 

Butter Tart Recipe from Canada

stacked butter tarts from butter tart recipe

Butter Tarts are a quintessential Canadian dessert that vaguely resemble the interior of pecan pie. This butter tart recipe can be enjoyed plain or with walnuts, raisins, or chocolate chips. 

When I was talking to my Aunt Lori (a Canadian) about the best Canadian food that I should make for the blog, her immediate response was “butter tarts.” Butter tarts, according to every Canadian I’ve ever talked to, are a Canadian obsession. They rest in the windows of most bakeries in Canada. 

Today my Aunt Lori was kind enough to share her go-to butter tart recipe with us, a beautiful homage to her familial ancestry. The crust recipe comes from one grandmother while the filling recipe comes from her other grandmother. Can you image a recipe better than one that comes from two grandmothers?

The best part about this butter tart recipe is that it can customized however you’d like. From raisin, to walnut, to plain, to pecan chocolate chip, we are making all kinds of butter tarts on the blog today! Keep reading for more info on how to make these delicious treats!

display of baked butter tart recipe

Who Invented the Butter Tart Recipe? 

Butter tarts, if I haven’t mentioned it enough already, are Canadian in origin. In the 1660s, 800 young women moved from France to Quebec, Canada. It is often thought that the butter tart originated from this move…. 

These women mostly likely tried to replicate one of their recipes from home: sugar pie. Of course, not all ingredients from France were accessible in Canada, so a variation of sugar pie, AKA the butter tart recipe, was born! 

individual butter tart

What are is this Butter Tart Recipe Made Out Of? 

Pastry: 

All-purpose flour
Salt
Unsalted butter
Lard
Ice Water
Sour Cream

Filling: 

Eggs
Dark brown sugar
Light corn syrup
Butter
Lemon juice
Vanilla 

Add ins (optional): 

Raisins
Walnuts
Pecans
Chocolate chips

How to Make this Butter Tart Recipe 

individual butter tart

Pastry: 

Whisk together flour and salt. 

Add cold butter and lard and then use a pastry cutter to cut them into crumbs.

In a separate bowl, whisk together sour cream and ice water. Add into the dough with two more tsp of cold water and knead to combine.

Knead until a ball is formed, flatten (a little) into a disk, and wrap in saran wrap. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. 

After refrigeration, roll out the dough until it ⅛” thick. Use a 4” cookie cutter to cut out 12 circles.

Place the circles lightly in a muffin tin, and press the edges inward until the pastry circle forms a bowl.

Place in the fridge for another 30 minutes. 

butter tart filling

Filling:

Whisk your eggs in a bowl. Add the brown sugar, corn syrup, and melted butter and whisk together. 

Add lemon juice and vanilla extract and beat. 

filling butter tart
Don’t be as messy as me…. clean up any drips that fall onto your tin 🙂

Put it Together: 

Spoon filling into pastry so that the pastry cups are ½ full. Also fill cups with add-in options if desired. You will have filling left over. 

Bake at 325 for 20-25 minutes until the filling is set and the pastry is golden brown.

Remove from oven and allow to cool on a wire cooling rack. Run a knife around the edges to release the tart. 

tray of baked butter tarts

How to Get Butter Tarts Out Of the Pan?

Aunt Lori gave me very specific instructions for making sure that your butter tarts come out of the pan alright.

First of all, be proactive in your approach. Don’t press the crust into the muffin tin. Instead, lay the dough across the muffin tin and gently push the sides in.

Secondly, be very careful not to get any filling between the crust and the muffin tin when baking. This will adhere the tart to the pan. 

The third most important tip for getting the tart out of the pan is to run a thin knife around the perimeter of the tart before attempting to remove it from the pan. Once the tart starts to spin around in the pan as you move the knife, it is ready to be pulled out! 

Butter tarts on display

Can Butter Tarts Be Left Out? Can Butter Tarts Be Frozen? 

Yes, you can leave your butter tarts in an airtight container on the counter for about two hours. After this, make sure to put your butter tarts in the fridge, for about 5 days. If you’d still like to keep your butter tarts for longer, they can last in the freezer for up to 6 months. Make sure to thaw them completely before enjoying!

That’s all! If you have any more questions for me about this butter tart recipe, drop them in the comments below. And if you make this recipe and like it, you might also like: 

stacked butter tarts from butter tart recipe
5 from 1 vote
Print

Butter Tart Recipe

Butter Tarts are a quintessential Canadian dessert that vaguely resemble the interior of pecan pie. They are made individually, and can be enjoyed plain or with walnuts, raisins, or chocolate chips.

Course baking, Dessert, pie
Cuisine canada
Prep Time 40 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Resting Time 1 hour
Servings 12 servings

Ingredients

Pastry Ingredients

  • 1 ¼ cups all purpose flour
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ¼ cup cold unsalted butter cut into cubes
  • ¼ cup lard cut into cubes
  • 2 tbsp ice water plus more if necessary
  • 4 tbsp regular sour cream

Filling Ingredients

  • 2 eggs lightly beaten
  • 1 cup light or dark brown sugar
  • 1 cup light corn syrup
  • ¼ cup melted butter
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • Chopped walnuts optional
  • Chopped pecans optional
  • Chocolate chips optional
  • Raisins optional

Instructions

Pastry Instructions

  1. Whisk together flour and salt. Add cold cubed butter and lard to flour with salt.
  2. Use a pastry cutter to cut into fine crumbs with some larger pieces and set aside.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk together ice cream and sour cream until smooth. Add smooth mixture to “cut” pastry while stirring with a fork.
  4. Add 2 tsp extra ice water to pastry and knead to form a “ragged” dough ball.
  5. Place ball on saran wrap and press into a flat disc shape. Cover completely with saran and refrigerate for 30 minutes. You can refrigerate this dough for up to three days.
  6. Remove disk from refrigerator. On lightly floured surface, roll out pastry to ⅛” thickness. Lightly flour pin as needed.
  7. Using 4” cutter and cut into 12 circles. Do not be afraid to reroll scraps to cut all 12 circles. Fit into 12 muffin cup tins. Refrigerate for 30 more minutes.

Filling Instructions

  1. Beat eggs. Add brown sugar, corn syrup, and melted butter and whisk together.
  2. Add vanilla and lemon juice and beat. Set aside.

Assembly Instructions

  1. Remove tart tin from refrigerator after 30 minutes. Add add-ins to pastry cups if desired. Spoon filling into each tart contained until each tart is ½-¾ full.
  2. Bake at 325 for 20-25 minutes until filling is set and pastry is a little golden brown.
  3. Remove from oven and place tart pan on an elevated wire cooling rack.
  4. Run thin knife around edges to release tart. Allow to completely cool approximately 30 minutes before removing tarts from tin.
  5. Store in airtight container for a few days. You can freeze your butter tarts for up to 6 months.
  6. Enjoy! Write a review on this post letting me know what you thought.

Fast and Easy Maple Cookies Recipe

Maple cookies strewn on the table with milk

These maple cookies are literally heaven on a plate. They have the perfect taste of maple– not overpowering but definitely not negligible. The dough can be made in 10 minutes, there is no resting period, and the cookies bake for about 10 minutes in the oven. Can you think of anything more perfect in these beautiful fall months? I think not. 

What this Maple Cookie Recipe taught me about cooking: Baking Soda is meant to be used in recipes that use a natural acid. These natural acids can include lemon juice, molasses, or buttermilk. Surprisingly enough, brown sugar is an “acid” that requires baking soda! 

Baking (along with reading) is, always and forever, my happy place. I love baking all the time, but I especially love baking on the days when life seems like it’s out of my control.

There’s something comforting about following a recipe to the T. There’s something reassuring about knowing that if you put exactly 1 cup of flour and exactly ½ cup of butter in your recipe, your creation will turn out exactly like it’s supposed to.

I will say this until the day I die: when my life feels like it’s outside of my control, I bake. 

15 maple cookies lined up

The Chemistry of Baking

This reassuring, comforting feeling of baking really disappears when you’re making up the recipe yourself. It’s for that reason that I almost dislike baking for the blog.

There’s a lot of chemistry that goes into baking, and, if I’m speaking candidly, I was never professional trained (or even ameaturely trained) in how exactly to get the chemistry of a recipe right. I love baking other people’s recipes, but coming up with my own brings a lot of stress into my Foreign Fork life. 

But as the year was coming to an end, I REALLY wanted to try my hand at baking cookies. The idea scared me, but the thought of finally coming up with my own perfect recipe– and my own perfect Maple Cookie Recipe nonetheless– was too enticing to scare me off.

I made FIVE batches of these Maple Cookies before I finally got them right! And thank goodness I did, because I think my pants were starting to fit a little tighter thanks to all of that cookie dough (oops!). 

I still wouldn’t say I’m a cookie-making expert, but I’m certainly more knowledgeable than I was before… and that’s the whole point of this blog, right?!

Stacked maple cookies with milk

Are Maple Cookies Canadian? 

Darn tootin! They definitely sound like it, eh? 

Hehe, sorry. 

Anyways, it’s a safe assumption that pretty much any recipe with maple syrup is Canadian in origin. In fact, Canada produces more than 80% of the world’s maple syrup, and they even have a stash in case of a natural disaster! They can’t live without it!

This recipe was entirely of my own creation, but maple cookies are a favorite in Canada (and you’re about to see why!) 

maple cookies strewn on the table

What’s in this Recipe for Maple Cookies? 

  • Butter
  • Dark brown sugar
  • Granulated sugar
  • Pure maple syrup 
  • An egg
  • Baking soda 
  • Salt
  • Vanilla
  • Maple extract (found near the vanilla extract)
  • Oats or oat flour
  • All purpose flour 

How to Make Maple Cookies

If you have oats instead of oat flour, place the oats in a food processor of blender and grind into a powder. It’s as easy as that!

Melt the butter almost completely and then cream together with brown sugar and granulated sugar until just combined. 

Add egg until just combined

Add maple syrup, vanilla extract, and maple extract until just combined

Use a wooden spoon to hand mix baking soda, salt, vanilla, oat flour, and all-purpose flour into a dough

Scoop into cookies and bake for 10 minutes at 375. Remove from oven but leave on pan to continue baking until cool. 

Maple cookies pinterest image

Can Dogs Eat Maple Cookies? 

Lol okay so I use this website called answerthepublic.com and you can type in any word and it will tell you the most common questions people google about that word. So I typed in “maple cookies” and this was one of the most common questions??

I’m not quite sure what these humans are thinking, but I figured I’d humor them (as long as you promise to humor me!) 

Ummmm my guess is that dogs CAN eat maple cookies? But CAN does not equal SHOULD. I would advise you to keep the maple cookies away from your dog’s tummy, just to stay on the safe side. Lol, what the heck, internet. 

Anyways, you should make this recipe for maple cookies. And if you do, you should leave a comment letting me know what you thought!

And if you liked this recipe, you’ll also like: 

Maple Cookies

These maple cookies are literally heaven on a plate. They have the perfect taste of maple– not overpowering but definitely not negligible. The dough can be made in 10 minutes, there is no resting period, and the cookies bake for about 10 minutes in the oven. Can you think of anything more perfect in these beautiful fall months? I think not. 

Course Cookies, Dessert
Cuisine canada
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings 32 cookies

Ingredients

  • ½ cup butter mostly melted
  • ½ cup dark brown sugar
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • ¼ cup pure maple syrup
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp vanilla
  • 3/4-1 tsp maple flavoring depending on flavor preference
  • 1 cup oats or oat flour
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. If using oats instead of oat flour, simply use a blender or food processor to grind the oats into a powder… now you have oat flour!

  3. Melt butter almost completely. In the bowl of stand mixer (or with an electric mixer) cream the butter together with brown sugar and granulated sugar until just combined.
  4. Add egg and mix until just combined.
  5. Add maple syrup, vanilla extract, and maple extract and mix until just combined.
  6. Use a wooden spoon to hand-mix baking soda, salt, oat flour, and all purpose flour.

  7. Use a small cookie scoop to scoop out dough onto ungreased cookie sheet.
  8. Bake for 10 minutes.
  9. Remove from the oven and leave on the cookie sheet to continue cooking until cooled.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational and personal use only.