Gyuveche (Casserole with Potatoes) from Bulgaria

Gyuveche is a delicious dish from Bulgaria. My version of gyuveche is made with beef, mushrooms, carrots, celery, and cheddar cheese. The dish is then topped with thin potatoes and over-easy eggs! 

What Exactly is Gyuveche? 

Gyuveche from Bulgaria is not named gyuveche because of the ingredients in the dish. Instead, the name comes from the clay pot that the dish is cooked in. Gyuveche is a catch-all term for a recipe that is cooked in the clay pot, usually with vegetables and beef and almost always topped with potatoes and eggs. 

Unfortunately, I didn’t own a true gyuveche pot. Instead, I had to take concept of the gyuveche recipe and make it in a ceramic baking dish. Don’t worry, I won’t judge you if you need to do the same. 

Personalizing your Gyuveche

A gyuveche is normally used as a way to clear out the refrigerator at the end of the week. There is a base of potatoes at the bottom and the top of the dish. Sandwiched between them are layers of meat, vegetables and cheese. A gyuveche changes based on the house you’re in, the person that’s cooking, or the week that it’s being made. If you have leftover carrots one week but not the next, totally fine! If you suddenly acquire a bunch of peas you need to get rid of, throw them in! And if you want to try feta cheese instead of cheddar, nothing is stopping you!

The gyuveche recipe that I’ve posted here today is what I made and tested a few times in my home. You can, of course, follow what I have written, but don’t be afraid to change it up if you want to as well. 

Still, though, I’m partial to this gyuveche recipe, mostly because I LOVE the cheddar cheese that I used in it. I made sure to use a high-quality, creamy cheddar. It really mixed well with the beef to create an awesome, gooey, delicious texture. 

Thousand Hills Beef

I also used Thousand Hills Beef for this recipe, and it was a game changer. Thousand Hills raises 100% grass-fed beef and has made it their mission to regenerate over 1,000 acres of nearly unusable soil so as to raise delicious, healthy cattle on. Thousand Hills’s mission is warming and impressive, so if you want to read more about it, you can on the “Story” section of their website. 

The folks at Thousand Hills sent me some samples a while back so that I could try their products. This was a perfect way for me to use their ground beef. I often get a little anxious buying beef from the grocery store. Normally this is because I have no control over the meat. I don’t know how the cow was raised, what it was fed, or what chemicals are in the food. Eating this meat from Thousand Hills made me far more open to eating beef, and I’m so glad that I was able to use their product to enjoy this delicious meal. 

Did you like this recipe from Bulgaria? Thanks for taking the time to read it! If you make this as home, make sure to take a photo of it and share it on Facebook or Instagram. Tag @TheForeignFork and @thousandhillslg or leave a comment on this post letting me know what you thought. If you liked this recipe, make sure to also check out this recipe for Silpancho from Bolivia or this Cevapi from Bosnia and Herzegovina. 

Gyuveche from Bulgaria

Gyuveche is a delicious dish from Bulgaria. My version of gyuveche is made with beef, tomatoes, mushrooms, carrots, celery, and cheddar cheese. The dish is then topped with thin potatoes and over-easy eggs! 

Course Main Course
Cuisine Bulgaria
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Servings 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp olive oil + more for potatoes
  • 1 tsp garlic
  • 1 lb ground beef
  • 1 onion chopped
  • ½ lb Mushrooms sliced
  • 3 potatoes peeled and thinly sliced into rounds
  • 3 carrot sticks chopped
  • 3 celery sticks chopped
  • 5 eggs
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste
  • Chubritsa to taste optional
  • 5 oz high quality Cheddar cheese

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. In a large pan, heat the olive oil and saute the garlic until fragrant. Then add the onions and mushrooms and saute until almost cooked.
  3. Add in meat and spices to taste and continue stirring the meat until cooked fully through. Drain.
  4. In a separate bowl, drizzle the potatoes rounds with about 3 tablespoons of olive oil and season with salt, pepper, and garlic powder to taste. Use your hands or a spoon to mix and make sure that the potatoes are evenly coated.
  5. In a casserole dish, spread a small layer of olive oil across the bottom of the pan. Layer half of the thinly-sliced potato rounds on the bottom of the pan.
  6. Top the potatoes with half of the shredded cheese. Add the meat and mushroom mixture, then layer on the carrots and celery, then the rest of the cheese.
  7. On top of the mixture, place the second half of the thinly-sliced potatoes.
  8. Place in the oven and cook for about 40 minutes, or until the potatoes are just starting to brown.
  9. Once the potatoes are browning, remove the casserole dish and crack the five eggs on top the potatoes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
  10. Place back in the oven for about 8-10 minutes or until the whites of the eggs are set but the yolk is runny.
  11. Remove from oven and let sit for 10 minutes before serving. Enjoy!
  12. Leave a comment on this recipe letting me know what you think.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only.

Palachinki (Honey Butter Filled Crepes) from Bulgaria

Palachinki are a version of crepes popular in Bulgaria. These Palachinki are rolled with a simple filling of butter and honey and are then sprinkled with powdered sugar and served with strawberries. This is SUCH a delicious breakfast, and I can’t wait to keep making them as a special Sunday breakfast!

To see a video of how I make this recipe, click here.

When I was backpacking Europe, I, of course, made it a point to go to Paris. The food in Paris was indescribable (I literally cannot WAIT to get to France. We’ll do a whole month of just French food alone), but one of my very favorite foods was something so simple… the crepe.

I’ve always loved crepes. I would get crepes in Lansing (shout out For Crepes Sake!) when I went to Michigan State University. I would get crepes in Washington Square Park when I lived in Manhattan, New York. I would get crepes for breakfast or dessert or a snack or literally for any other reason because I just really love them.

So, duh, when I saw that Palachinki (pretty much a breakfast crepe) was a popular food in Bulgaria, I got SO excited. I just had to make them!

Difference Between Bulgarian Palachinki and French Crepes

Now, Bulgarian Palachinki are a little different that French crepes or American crepes. In France or America, we tend to fill our crepes with everything sweet. Nutella, peanut butter, chocolate sauce… you name it. In Buglaria, crepes are handled a little differently. Typically, they’re filled with less extravagant toppings, like jam, feta cheese, or sometimes just plain, powdered sugar.

Bite of Palachinki on a fork with strawberries

Butter and Honey Filling

I chose to fill my Palachinki with a tasty butter and honey and my-oh-MY were they freaking DELICIOUS. I loved the simple honey filling because it really allowed me to taste the deliciousness of the crepe. I found that Nutella and peanut butter tended to overpower any other tastes in the crepe, but the honey is so light that it was a perfect combination. You can also top your Palachinki with powdered sugar for a touch of sweetness as well.

I love fruits with my breakfast, so don’t be afraid to add any fruit of your choice to your Palachinki plate! I chose strawberries, but bananas, blueberries, or raspberries would have also been delicious.

Close up of Palachinki with powdered sugar and strawberries

How to Cook Your Palachinki

To cook the Palachinki, heat your pan up completely before adding any batter. Put a small ladle of batter into the pan, and then pick up the pan and tilt it to allow the batter to spread over the entire pan. You want your batter to be very thin—this is the defining characteristic of a crepe! Cook it until It just begins to brown on one side, then flip it and allow it to continue browning on the other.

Just before serving, add the butter and the honey, sprinkle with some powdered sugar, and serve. It’s that easy! You’re welcome folks!

Did you like this quick and easy breakfast recipe? Make sure to also check out my recipe for Kaiserschmarrn (shredded pancakes) from Austria and Gondo Datschi (Scrambled Eggs with Herbs) from Bhutan. If you make this recipe, take a photo and share it on Instagram with the hashtag #TheForeignFork and tag @TheForeignFork. Thanks for stopping by! I will see you very soon ????

Honey Butter Crepes (Palachinki from Bulgaria)

Palachinki are a version of crepes popular in Bulgaria. These Palachinki are rolled
with a simple filling of butter and honey and are then sprinkled with powdered
sugar and served with strawberries. This is SUCH a delicious breakfast, and I
can’t wait to keep making them as a special Sunday breakfast!

Course Breakfast, Dessert
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes

Ingredients

Crepe Batter Ingredients

  • 4 eggs
  • 1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3 tbsp melted butter
  • 2 tbsp granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/3 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 cup water sparkling water works great but if you don’t have any then tap water is just fine

Topping Ingredients

  • Honey for filling
  • Softened butter for filling
  • Powdered sugar for topping
  • Strawberries for topping

Instructions

  1. Place all crepe batter ingredients in a blender and blend until combined.
  2. Heat a small-medium size pan on the stove until completely warmed up.
  3. Pour a small ladle of batter into the pan, and then tilt the pan to encourage the batter to cover the entire bottom surface. Make sure that the batter is thin, almost paperlike.
  4. Cook over medium heat until the batter dries and the bottom starts to brown. Use a spatula to flip over the crepe, and then cook on the other side until brown.
  5. Remove crepe from heat, and butter one side. Drizzle honey over the middle. Roll or fold the crepe. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and serve with fresh berries. Enjoy!
  6. Leave a comment on this blog post letting me know what you thought of the recipe! And post a photo to Instagram or Facebook using the hashtag #TheForeignFork.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 

Tarator (Cucumber Yogurt Soup) from Bulgaria

Jump to Recipe

Tarator is a Bulgarian cold soup made with yogurt and cucumbers. My version is also served with walnuts, dill, and red pepper. This soup is perfect for a light meal in the heat of summertime and would be delicious with a slice of crusty bread!

Bulgarians are HELLA proud of their yogurt, my friends. When I say proud, I don’t mean they’re like “hey look how cool this yogurt is” proud. I mean they’re like “yo, our yogurt rocks” proud. I mean they’re like “dudes, our yogurt is the literal best thing that has been made on planet earth” proud. And they’re not wrong!

How is Bulgarian Yogurt Different?

So Bulgarian yogurt is (obviously, based on the pride) different than most yogurts. First of all, the yogurt needs to be made with the Lactobacillus bulgaricus and the Streptococcus thermophilus bacteria. These two strains of bacteria are what gives the Bulgarian yogurt its classic taste, a taste that’s identifiable as Bulgarian from yogurt enthusiasts around the world. Bulgarian yogurt is creamy, but not as thick as Greek yogurt. It is a bit more tart than normal yogurt because it is typically made with sheep’s milk, not cow’s milk. For a taste of true Bulgarian yogurt, click here.

Health Benefits of Bulgarian Yogurt

In addition to its distinct taste, Bulgarian yogurt is also special because of its health benefits. The livestock that are used to make the yogurt (sheep and sometimes cows) graze on the herb-rich fields in Bulgaria. The nutrients and vitamins that are in the herbs are then transferred into the dairy of the animals. Bulgarian yogurt is known to be incredibly healthy because of this! This is why most Bulgarians credit their yogurt for their longevity.

Tarator Soup

So it’s clear by now that Bulgarians love their yogurt. Clearly, I had to make something with it! One of the most famous yogurt dishes in Bulgaria is Tarator, a cold yogurt, cucumber soup. This soup is perfect for the dog days of summer, when the sun is hot and you want a refreshing, light lunch to cool down with. This soup would be perfect served with some crusty bread!

Red Pepper in your Tarator

I’ll be straightforward with you all… I made this recipe without the red pepper, and the yogurt taste was just a bit strong for my liking. This doesn’t mean it was bad… Just that I wasn’t a huge fan myself. When I added in the red pepper, the yogurt taste was cut juuuust enough, and suddenly, this soup was making me do a little happy dance!

Make sure to top the soup with olive oil, dill, and walnuts like I did! It makes the serving SO beautiful, and so much fun to eat!

If this soup made you happy dance like it did for me, I want you to let me know! Leave me a comment on this post, and post a photo to Facebook or Instagram tagging @TheForeignFork and hashtagging #TheForeignFork. If you liked this soup recipe, you’d also like this Thai Inspired Meatball Soup with Rice Noodles, this Borsht Soup from Belarus, or this Chickpea Stew from Algeria. Thanks so much for stopping by everyone! I can’t wait to keep cooking the rest of Bulgaria with you. 

Cold Cucumber Yogurt Soup (Bulgaria)

Tarator is a Bulgarian cold soup made with yogurt and
cucumbers. My version is also served with walnuts, dill, and red pepper. This
soup is perfect for a light meal in the heat of summertime and would be
delicious with a slice of crusty bread!

Course Appetizer, Main Course, Soup
Cuisine Bulgaria
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings 6 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 large cucumber peeled, seeded, and chopped
  • 1/4 cup walnuts or more for garnishing
  • 1 tbsp olive oil or more for garnishing
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp salt or more to taste
  • 1 cup yogurt plain, non-flavored
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice or more to taste
  • 1/3 red pepper chopped
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 tbsp fresh dill

Instructions

  1. Peel the cucumber and cut it the long way down the middle. Use a spoon to scoop out the seeds. Then, chop the cucumbers into 1/2 inch cubes.

  2. In a food processor or blender, blend the walnuts and olive oil together until very fine.

  3. Add the rest of the ingredients except the water into the food processor.

  4. Pulse lightly so that the soup blends but does not becomes too fine.

  5. Add the water little by little until soup reaches desires consistency.

  6. Garnish soup with a drizzle of olive oil, chopped walnuts, and fresh dill. Enjoy!

  7. Leave a comment on this recipe to let me know what you thought.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only.