Rice Porridge Recipe

vertical rice porridge

This recipe for rice porridge is a common breakfast in the country of Chad. Making it reminds me of making oatmeal for breakfast, but instead of oats, white rice is used! I top my rice porridge with peanut butter, bananas, and brown sugar. 

This rice porridge is a great way to enjoy the beauty of another country while also using ingredients and techniques that are common in Western homes. 

It’s not that the ingredients, methods, or cooking styles used to make this dish are exotic or unique. The combination is simply something that I wouldn’t normally think to make without some prompting from Chad.   

This rice porridge is a traditional breakfast in Chad, and can be enjoyed many different ways. Peanut butter is fairly standard across the board– you’d be hard pressed to find a recipe for Bouillie (the name for rice porridge in Chad) without it. 

I typically eat my oatmeal with peanut butter and banana in the mornings, so I stuck with bananas. You can also choose to add strawberries or any other fruit of your choosing. 

close up of rice porridge

Can Rice Porridge be Reheated?

This recipe for rice porridge cooks up nice and creamy and thick. The longer you let your rice porridge cool, the thicker it begins to be. I would recommend eating your rice porridge fresh. If you do need to reheat it, add a bit of milk into the bowl/pot before warming. This will add some moisture back into the recipe. 

Is Rice Porridge Healthy? 

I would definitely say that this rice porridge is on the healthier side of breakfast foods, though this depends largely on what ingredients you choose to top your breakfast with. 

If you are trying to keep your rice porridge on the healthier side, I would recommend using no brown sugar and controlled portions of peanut butter. 

What Ingredients are in this Rice Porridge Recipe? 

Water
Long grain white rice 
Peanut butter
Whole wheat flour
Banana slices
Brown sugar 

For full ingredient measurements and instructions, visit the recipe card at the bottom of the page. 

horizontal photo of rice porridge

How to Cook Rice Porridge On the Stove

In a small pot, boil your water on the stove. 

Add rice into the pot and reduce the heat to a simmer. 

Cook rice for 8 minutes, uncovered. 

Mix flour with some extra water and add to the pot alongside the peanut butter. 

Cook, uncovered for 10 minutes, stirring frequently to ensure your rice doesn’t burn.

Top with more peanut butter, brown sugar, and bananas and enjoy! 

Did you like this breakfast recipe from Chad? Make sure to check out more Foreign Fork breakfast recipes by visiting the following pages: 

Rice Porridge

This rice porridge recipe from Chad is the perfect breakfast recipe! It is topped with brown sugar, peanut butter, and bananas.

Course Breakfast, Main Course, rice
Cuisine chad
Cook Time 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups water
  • ½ cup water extra
  • ½ cup rice
  • 2 tbsp peanut butter I used Jif
  • 2 tbsp whole wheat flour

Toppings

  • Peanut Butter
  • Banana slices
  • Brown sugar

Instructions

  1. In a small pot, boil you water on the stove.

  2. Add rice into the pot and reduce the heat to a simmer.

  3. Cook rice for 8 minutes, uncovered.

  4. Mix flour with some extra water and add to the pot alongside the peanut butter.

  5. Cook, uncovered, for 10 minutes, stirring frequently to ensure your rice doesn't burn.

  6. Top with more peanut butter, brown sugar, and bananas. Enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 

Benne Wafers Recipe (Sesame Seed Cookies)

Benne wafers in a circle on a plate

Benne Wafers are another word for thin, crispy cookies made with sesame seeds. This recipe creates delicious, crunchy cookies that are great with milk! 

Until today, I’ve never really considered sesame seeds an ingredient if you know what I mean. A topping? Sure. But a full-on ingredient… not really. 

I’m excited though, because this recipe for Benne Wafers from the Central African Republic really showed me the beauty of sesame seeds. When the sesame seeds toast, they have a beautiful flavor that’s all their own.


The seeds in these cookies make them a great middle ground for people that don’t have a huge sweet tooth. They taste a bit toasty and savory, but the cookie batter makes them sweet and delicious!  

Benne wafers on a plate

What Are Benne Wafers? 

Benne wafers are cookies that originated in Africa, but are now very popular in America as well. To make these cookies, toast sesame seeds and then combine them with a buttery cookie dough. When the cookies bake, the bottoms get very crispy and crunchy!

What Ingredients Are Used to Make this Recipe? 

Sesame seeds
Egg
Butter
Flour
Brown sugar 
Salt 
Baking powder 
Vanilla 

How Are Benne Wafers Made? 

First, you’ll need to toast your sesame seeds for about 15 minutes at 350 degrees. 

Melt butter in your microwave and use an electric hand mixer to combine with sugar in a large bowl.

Add egg and mix again.

Combine flour and baking powder into the dough and hand mix until a dough is formed. 

Add the toasted sesame seeds. 

Use a small cookie scoop to scoop balls of dough. I placed my cookies on an open air cookie sheet covered in parchment paper. 

Bake at 375 degrees for 14 minutes. Allow cookies to cool and then enjoy!

Where Did this Recipe Come From?

Benne wafers originated in Africa and are very popular in the Central African Republic. However, when slaves were transported to America, they brought their favorite recipes with them. These slaves began making their benne wafer recipe Now, benne wafers are a popular snack in South Carolina (for example, the Olde Colony Bakery is home to the Charleston Version of Benne Wafers!

Thanks for reading! If you want more cookie recipes, check out my other blog posts: 

Pinterest graphic for benne wafers

Benne Wafers (Sesame Seed Cookies)

Benne wafers from Central African Republic are beautifully crispy, crunchy cookies made with sesame seeds!

Course baking, Cookies, Dessert
Cuisine central african republic
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 14 minutes
Servings 30 cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sesame seeds
  • 1 egg
  • ¾ cup butter melted
  • 1 cup flour
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • ¼ tsp Salt
  • ¼ tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp vanilla

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Place sesame seeds on a cookie sheet and toast for about 15 minutes, checking and stirring them every 5 minutes or so. Keep a close eye on your sesame seeds as they burn easily.

  2. Remove the sesame seeds from the oven and place them aside to cool.

  3. Bump oven up to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

  4. Melt butter and use an electric mixer to combine with sugar.

  5. Add egg and mix with electric mixer again.

  6. Add flour and baking powder and use a spoon to mix by hand.

  7. Line an open air cooking sheet with parchment paper. Scoop 12 cookies onto your cookie sheet and bake at 375 for about 14 minutes. Your cookies will start to brown and be very thin and wafery!

  8. Allow to cool fully and enjoy!

  9. Leave a comment on this post letting me know what you think.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational and personal use only. 

Cookie Butter Recipe

Cookie butter platter

If you’ve ever wanted to taste a spoonful of creamy, decadent, drool-causing heaven, try cookie butter. I’m not kidding, I think cookie butter is the single best invention that human-kind has ever created. And it’s all thanks to Belgium! 

If cookie butter is one of my favorite inventions of all time, it should come as no surprise that it’s also my favorite topping for Belgian waffles…. Spread a spoonful of this on my recipe for liege waffles, and holy moly, you have some heaven.

horizontal cookie butter spread

What is Cookie Butter? 

Okay, fair question. Cookie butter is kind of like peanut butter in a way, except that its made with… you guessed it… cookies! 

Typical jarred cookie butter is made by grinding speculoos cookies into a peanut butter-like consistency. It has the flavors of a biscoff cookie, and a granier texture than peanut butter. It’s sweet and oooh so yummy. 

My recipe isn’t made with speculoos cookies, but you could make it that way if you want. Instead, I used leftover homemade cookies from some batches of recipe testing that I did! 

What is in this Recipe? 

Cumbs from hard, crispy cookies (can use store bought or just stale cookies)
Heavy cream 
Vanilla
Melted butter
Brown sugar

For full ingredient measurements and instructions, visit the recipe card at the bottom of the page. 

close up of cookie butter recipe

How Do I Make Cookie Butter?

Pulse 8 oz of cookie crumbs in food processor or blender until VERY fine. 

Add cream, vanilla, butter, and brown sugar. Blend until you reach peanut butter consistency. 

Add in one more ounce of crispy cookie crumbs to give the butter a firmer texture. 

What Cookies Should I Use? 

I used the leftover cookies that I had from recipe testing my Fast and Easy Maple Cookies, so homemade cookies are always an option if you’d like. I left my cookies out on the counter for two days to get stale before using them for this cookie butter. 

Homemade cookies resulted in a creamier butter, but if you use store bought cookies, such as Oreos, Biscoff, or Chips Ahoy, your cookie butter will be grittier. 

What Can Cookie Butter Be Used For? 

Plenty of things! My favorite way to use cookie butter is as a dip… I love it with bananas, pretzels, crackers, carrots, or anything else. You can also use cookie butter as a topping for things like waffles or pancakes. If you’re feeling really adventurous, you can even bake it into brownies!

Can I Eat Cookie Butter Raw? 

Yes, absolutely! Cookie butter is made to be eaten right out of the jar. It is made by grinding fully cooked cookies into crumbs and then adding cream, etc. There is no risk to eating cookie butter raw.

Thanks for reading everyone! If you liked this recipe, you’ll also like:

cookie butter pinterest image

Cookie Butter

Course Appetizer, Dessert, dip, spreads
Cuisine Belgium
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings 1 cup

Ingredients

  • 9 oz of crumbs from hard crispy cookies (can use store bought, hard cookies or just stale, homemade cookies).
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 2 tbsp melted butter
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar

Instructions

  1. Pulse 8 oz of cookie crumbs in food processor or blender until VERY fine.
  2. Add ¼ cup of cream, vanilla, butter, and brown sugar. Blend until peanut butter consistency is reached.
  3. Add in one more ounce of crispy cookie crumbs to give the butter a firmer texture

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only.

Butter Tart Recipe from Canada

stacked butter tarts from butter tart recipe

Butter Tarts are a quintessential Canadian dessert that vaguely resemble the interior of pecan pie. This butter tart recipe can be enjoyed plain or with walnuts, raisins, or chocolate chips. 

When I was talking to my Aunt Lori (a Canadian) about the best Canadian food that I should make for the blog, her immediate response was “butter tarts.” Butter tarts, according to every Canadian I’ve ever talked to, are a Canadian obsession. They rest in the windows of most bakeries in Canada. 

Today my Aunt Lori was kind enough to share her go-to butter tart recipe with us, a beautiful homage to her familial ancestry. The crust recipe comes from one grandmother while the filling recipe comes from her other grandmother. Can you image a recipe better than one that comes from two grandmothers?

The best part about this butter tart recipe is that it can customized however you’d like. From raisin, to walnut, to plain, to pecan chocolate chip, we are making all kinds of butter tarts on the blog today! Keep reading for more info on how to make these delicious treats!

display of baked butter tart recipe

Who Invented the Butter Tart Recipe? 

Butter tarts, if I haven’t mentioned it enough already, are Canadian in origin. In the 1660s, 800 young women moved from France to Quebec, Canada. It is often thought that the butter tart originated from this move…. 

These women mostly likely tried to replicate one of their recipes from home: sugar pie. Of course, not all ingredients from France were accessible in Canada, so a variation of sugar pie, AKA the butter tart recipe, was born! 

individual butter tart

What are is this Butter Tart Recipe Made Out Of? 

Pastry: 

All-purpose flour
Salt
Unsalted butter
Lard
Ice Water
Sour Cream

Filling: 

Eggs
Dark brown sugar
Light corn syrup
Butter
Lemon juice
Vanilla 

Add ins (optional): 

Raisins
Walnuts
Pecans
Chocolate chips

How to Make this Butter Tart Recipe 

individual butter tart

Pastry: 

Whisk together flour and salt. 

Add cold butter and lard and then use a pastry cutter to cut them into crumbs.

In a separate bowl, whisk together sour cream and ice water. Add into the dough with two more tsp of cold water and knead to combine.

Knead until a ball is formed, flatten (a little) into a disk, and wrap in saran wrap. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. 

After refrigeration, roll out the dough until it ⅛” thick. Use a 4” cookie cutter to cut out 12 circles.

Place the circles lightly in a muffin tin, and press the edges inward until the pastry circle forms a bowl.

Place in the fridge for another 30 minutes. 

butter tart filling

Filling:

Whisk your eggs in a bowl. Add the brown sugar, corn syrup, and melted butter and whisk together. 

Add lemon juice and vanilla extract and beat. 

filling butter tart
Don’t be as messy as me…. clean up any drips that fall onto your tin 🙂

Put it Together: 

Spoon filling into pastry so that the pastry cups are ½ full. Also fill cups with add-in options if desired. You will have filling left over. 

Bake at 325 for 20-25 minutes until the filling is set and the pastry is golden brown.

Remove from oven and allow to cool on a wire cooling rack. Run a knife around the edges to release the tart. 

tray of baked butter tarts

How to Get Butter Tarts Out Of the Pan?

Aunt Lori gave me very specific instructions for making sure that your butter tarts come out of the pan alright.

First of all, be proactive in your approach. Don’t press the crust into the muffin tin. Instead, lay the dough across the muffin tin and gently push the sides in.

Secondly, be very careful not to get any filling between the crust and the muffin tin when baking. This will adhere the tart to the pan. 

The third most important tip for getting the tart out of the pan is to run a thin knife around the perimeter of the tart before attempting to remove it from the pan. Once the tart starts to spin around in the pan as you move the knife, it is ready to be pulled out! 

Butter tarts on display

Can Butter Tarts Be Left Out? Can Butter Tarts Be Frozen? 

Yes, you can leave your butter tarts in an airtight container on the counter for about two hours. After this, make sure to put your butter tarts in the fridge, for about 5 days. If you’d still like to keep your butter tarts for longer, they can last in the freezer for up to 6 months. Make sure to thaw them completely before enjoying!

That’s all! If you have any more questions for me about this butter tart recipe, drop them in the comments below. And if you make this recipe and like it, you might also like: 

stacked butter tarts from butter tart recipe
5 from 1 vote
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Butter Tart Recipe

Butter Tarts are a quintessential Canadian dessert that vaguely resemble the interior of pecan pie. They are made individually, and can be enjoyed plain or with walnuts, raisins, or chocolate chips.

Course baking, Dessert, pie
Cuisine canada
Prep Time 40 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Resting Time 1 hour
Servings 12 servings

Ingredients

Pastry Ingredients

  • 1 ¼ cups all purpose flour
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ¼ cup cold unsalted butter cut into cubes
  • ¼ cup lard cut into cubes
  • 2 tbsp ice water plus more if necessary
  • 4 tbsp regular sour cream

Filling Ingredients

  • 2 eggs lightly beaten
  • 1 cup light or dark brown sugar
  • 1 cup light corn syrup
  • ¼ cup melted butter
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • Chopped walnuts optional
  • Chopped pecans optional
  • Chocolate chips optional
  • Raisins optional

Instructions

Pastry Instructions

  1. Whisk together flour and salt. Add cold cubed butter and lard to flour with salt.
  2. Use a pastry cutter to cut into fine crumbs with some larger pieces and set aside.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk together ice cream and sour cream until smooth. Add smooth mixture to “cut” pastry while stirring with a fork.
  4. Add 2 tsp extra ice water to pastry and knead to form a “ragged” dough ball.
  5. Place ball on saran wrap and press into a flat disc shape. Cover completely with saran and refrigerate for 30 minutes. You can refrigerate this dough for up to three days.
  6. Remove disk from refrigerator. On lightly floured surface, roll out pastry to ⅛” thickness. Lightly flour pin as needed.
  7. Using 4” cutter and cut into 12 circles. Do not be afraid to reroll scraps to cut all 12 circles. Fit into 12 muffin cup tins. Refrigerate for 30 more minutes.

Filling Instructions

  1. Beat eggs. Add brown sugar, corn syrup, and melted butter and whisk together.
  2. Add vanilla and lemon juice and beat. Set aside.

Assembly Instructions

  1. Remove tart tin from refrigerator after 30 minutes. Add add-ins to pastry cups if desired. Spoon filling into each tart contained until each tart is ½-¾ full.
  2. Bake at 325 for 20-25 minutes until filling is set and pastry is a little golden brown.
  3. Remove from oven and place tart pan on an elevated wire cooling rack.
  4. Run thin knife around edges to release tart. Allow to completely cool approximately 30 minutes before removing tarts from tin.
  5. Store in airtight container for a few days. You can freeze your butter tarts for up to 6 months.
  6. Enjoy! Write a review on this post letting me know what you thought.

Easy Bread Pudding Recipe

bite taken out of bread pudding

This easy bread pudding recipe might just be one of the ones that I have worked hardest on for the entirety of my blog…. And I’m telling you: The results speak for themselves. It is INCREDIBLE you guys.

It’s easy to make and warm and a little gooey but a little crunchy and cinnamony. And its delicious by itself, but then when you add the vanilla sauce to it… Oh. My. God. I could eat that vanilla sauce with a spoon right out of the pot. 

easy Bread pudding with vanilla sauce

Bread Pudding with Brioche Rolls

I made this easy bread pudding recipe with Bakerly’s chocolate chip brioche rolls! It took a while, but I finally perfected how to get the dessert to have the perfect amount of moisture. It’s soft but not too runny, and the top has a little bit of crunch but it’s not too tough. Is it rude to say I think it’s perfect? 

What’s Bread Pudding? 

If you have this question, you are not alone! Bread pudding is a delicious dessert made with stale bread. The bread is soaked in a sugary custard and it is all baked in the oven. It’s best served warm especially with, you guessed it… the vanilla sauce. 

vanilla sauce being poured on bread pudding

Where did Bread Pudding Originate? 

Another common question! Most people think that bread pudding is British in origin, but it actually goes back much further than that. Versions of bread pudding date back to Ancient Rome and Ancient Egypt. 

In these times, food was scarce and it was unthinkable to waste anything… if bread went stale, it was common to find other uses for it, including stuffing, thickeners for soup, and bread pudding! With this, the shelf life of the fragile bread could be extended.

In the 18th century, bread pudding was often considered a great food to feed to sick people. This is because it was easy to digest, as the bread was soft and delicious.

Though bread pudding originally began as a food of the poorer people, it has now gained popularity in modern life; It is often served as a trendy dessert at fashionable restaurants. Luckily for you, it’s easy to make at home as well… and you’ll look like a pro baker!  

3 plates of bread pudding

Does Bread Pudding Have to Be Refrigerated? Can it Be Reheated? 

I always top the entirety of my bread pudding with the vanilla sauce and then place the leftovers in the refrigerator. It can last in the fridge for up to a week!

When it comes time to eat your bread pudding, it is easy to reheat! My favorite method is just cutting a piece and heating it in the microwave for about 10-15 seconds. This is long enough that the bread doesn’t become hard but the vanilla sauce gets nice and gooey again. You’re welcome 😉 

ingredients needed for bread pudding recipe

What Ingredients are in this Easy Bread Pudding Recipe? 

Bread Pudding: 

Chocolate chip brioche rolls from Bakerly
Eggs 
Granulated sugar
Brown sugar
Half and half
Whole milk 
Cinnamon 
Vanilla 
Baking soda 
Salt 
Butter

Vanilla Sauce: 

Heavy cream 
Granulated sugar
Vanilla extract
Butter
Cinnamon

Visit the recipe card at the bottom of this post for ingredient measurements and instructions. 

How Do I Make this Easy Bread Pudding Recipe? 

To Make the Bread Pudding:

Make sure all liquid ingredients are at room temperature.

Cut the rolls into 8ths and allow to sit out on the counter for a day so that they are stale. 

Preheat an oven to 350 degrees and toast bread cubes for about 6-8 minutes, keeping a close eye on them. You want them to be toasted but not burnt. 

Wet ingredients for bread pudding in kitchenaid

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs. Add granulated sugar, brown sugar, half and half, whole milk, cinnamon, vanilla, baking soda and salt to the bowl. Mix until fully combined. Add the melted butter into the combination and mix again. 

toasted cubes for bread pudding

Place all toasted bread cubes in an ungreased 9×13 pan. I liked using a metal or a ceramic baking dish the best! 

Pouring liquid for bread pudding
mixing bread pudding

Pour the liquid mixture into the pan, and use a rubber spatula to stir the bread cubes around so that each cube is coated in the mixture. Allow the bread cubes to soak for about 15 minutes. 

Place in the oven at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. 

Remove the pan from oven and cover with aluminum foil. Cut slits in the top of the aluminum foil and then place the pan back into the oven for an additional 10 minutes. 

The bread pudding should be set but not dried out. It should also not be too liquidy. 

Remove and allow to rest for 10 minutes before eating. 

mixing ingredients for delicious vanilla sauce

To make the vanilla sauce: 

Place all ingredients in a medium sized sauce pan.

Bring to a low boil. Once boiling start a timer. Whisk constantly for 10 minutes.

Pour directly onto bread pudding before serving. Enjoy! 

Why Does Some Bread Pudding Get Soggy?

Ah, I’m glad you asked, because as I was developing the recipe, I had this problem, too! (but don’t worry, I finally got the measurements/instructions right and there is no sogginess in sight when you make this recipe). 

So the reasoning behind sogginess in a bread pudding can be threefold:

Bread Isn’t Stale Enough

First, your bread wasn’t stale enough. If your bread is still pretty mushy when you’re putting it into the bread pudding, you might end up with a stale pudding. Try using fully stale bread. 

If you don’t have any, leave your bread out overnight on the countertop so that it can become stale. And if you don’t have that much time, you can always toast your bread in the oven a little bit. 

Because the Bakerly buns are so moist and yummy, I combined two of these methods. First, I allowed my bread to become stale on the countertop overnight, and then I finished it off with a quick toasting right before making the recipe. 

pouring vanilla sauce onto bread pudding

Too Much Liquid

The second reason your bread pudding is soggy could be because you’ve added too much liquid. This one is a pretty self explanatory fix. The ratios in this recipe should eliminate that problem.  

Aluminum Foil

The last reason your bread pudding is soggy could be because of aluminum foil! If you cook your bread pudding with aluminum foil on the top, some of the moisture can’t escape during the cooking process and instead succeeds in leaving your bread damp and soggy. 

If you need to cover your bread pudding while you’re baking it, cut some slits into the top of the aluminum foil. This will keep the dessert from burning, but will allow the liquid to escape while it’s cooking. 

single slice of bread pudding

Working with Bakerly 

I have loved working with Bakerly because their brand aligns so well with mine! It is Bakerly’s mission to bring the delicious food of France to American families… Would you look at that!? Sound familiar? If you want to read more about Bakerly’s background and mission. And if you need help locating where you can find Bakerly products, check out this store locator!

Thanks to Bakerly for allowing me to experiment with your products! Watch the video below to watch step by step how I make this recipe. 

If you liked this recipe, you’ll probably also like these recipes: 

Thanks for stopping by! If you liked this recipe, leave a comment below letting me know what you thought. Don’t forget to post a photo on Facebook or Instagram of your easy bread pudding recipe and tag @TheForeignFork and hashtag #TheForeignFork. I’ll see you soon! 


single slice of bread pudding
5 from 1 vote
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Easy Bread Pudding Recipe

This easy bread pudding recipe is warm and cinnamony and homey. The only thing that makes it better is the heavenly vanilla sauce on top!

Course Dessert
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Servings 16 servings

Ingredients

For Bread Pudding

  • 1 package chocolate chip brioche rolls + 3 rolls by Bakerly
  • 4 eggs room temp
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup half and half room temp
  • 1/4 cup whole milk room temp
  • 1.5 tsp cinnamon
  • 1.5 tsp vanilla
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 4 tbsp melted butter

For Vanilla Sauce

  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 stick butter
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon

Instructions

  1. Cut the rolls into 8ths and allow to sit out on the counter for a day so that they are stale.
  2. Preheat an oven to 350 degrees and toast bread cubes for about 6-8 minutes, keeping a close eye on them. You want them to be toasted but not burnt.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs.
  4. Add granulated sugar, brown sugar, half and half, whole milk, cinnamon, vanilla, baking soda and salt to the bowl. Mix until fully combined.

  5. Add the melted butter into the combination and mix again.
  6. Place all toasted bread cubes in an ungreased 9×13 pan. I liked using a metal or ceramic pan.

  7. Pour the liquid mixture into the pan with the bread cubes, and use a rubber spatula to stir the bread cubes around so that each cube is coated in the mixture. Allow the bread cubes to soak for about 15 minutes.

  8. Place in the oven at 350 for 40 minutes.

  9. Remove from oven and cover pan with aluminum foil. Cut slits in the top of the aluminum foil and then place the pan back into the oven for an additional 10 minutes. The bread pudding should be set but not dried out. It should also not be too liquidy.

  10. Allow to rest for 10 minutes

To Make Vanilla Sauce

  1. Place all ingredients in a medium sized sauce pan. Bring to a low boil. Once the boil starts, start your timer. Whisk constantly for 10 minutes.

  2. Pour directly onto bread pudding before serving. Enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 

Fast and Easy Maple Cookies Recipe

Maple cookies strewn on the table with milk

These maple cookies are literally heaven on a plate. They have the perfect taste of maple– not overpowering but definitely not negligible. The dough can be made in 10 minutes, there is no resting period, and the cookies bake for about 10 minutes in the oven. Can you think of anything more perfect in these beautiful fall months? I think not. 

What this Maple Cookie Recipe taught me about cooking: Baking Soda is meant to be used in recipes that use a natural acid. These natural acids can include lemon juice, molasses, or buttermilk. Surprisingly enough, brown sugar is an “acid” that requires baking soda! 

Baking (along with reading) is, always and forever, my happy place. I love baking all the time, but I especially love baking on the days when life seems like it’s out of my control.

There’s something comforting about following a recipe to the T. There’s something reassuring about knowing that if you put exactly 1 cup of flour and exactly ½ cup of butter in your recipe, your creation will turn out exactly like it’s supposed to.

I will say this until the day I die: when my life feels like it’s outside of my control, I bake. 

15 maple cookies lined up

The Chemistry of Baking

This reassuring, comforting feeling of baking really disappears when you’re making up the recipe yourself. It’s for that reason that I almost dislike baking for the blog.

There’s a lot of chemistry that goes into baking, and, if I’m speaking candidly, I was never professional trained (or even ameaturely trained) in how exactly to get the chemistry of a recipe right. I love baking other people’s recipes, but coming up with my own brings a lot of stress into my Foreign Fork life. 

But as the year was coming to an end, I REALLY wanted to try my hand at baking cookies. The idea scared me, but the thought of finally coming up with my own perfect recipe– and my own perfect Maple Cookie Recipe nonetheless– was too enticing to scare me off.

I made FIVE batches of these Maple Cookies before I finally got them right! And thank goodness I did, because I think my pants were starting to fit a little tighter thanks to all of that cookie dough (oops!). 

I still wouldn’t say I’m a cookie-making expert, but I’m certainly more knowledgeable than I was before… and that’s the whole point of this blog, right?!

Stacked maple cookies with milk

Are Maple Cookies Canadian? 

Darn tootin! They definitely sound like it, eh? 

Hehe, sorry. 

Anyways, it’s a safe assumption that pretty much any recipe with maple syrup is Canadian in origin. In fact, Canada produces more than 80% of the world’s maple syrup, and they even have a stash in case of a natural disaster! They can’t live without it!

This recipe was entirely of my own creation, but maple cookies are a favorite in Canada (and you’re about to see why!) 

maple cookies strewn on the table

What’s in this Recipe for Maple Cookies? 

  • Butter
  • Dark brown sugar
  • Granulated sugar
  • Pure maple syrup 
  • An egg
  • Baking soda 
  • Salt
  • Vanilla
  • Maple extract (found near the vanilla extract)
  • Oats or oat flour
  • All purpose flour 

How to Make Maple Cookies

If you have oats instead of oat flour, place the oats in a food processor of blender and grind into a powder. It’s as easy as that!

Melt the butter almost completely and then cream together with brown sugar and granulated sugar until just combined. 

Add egg until just combined

Add maple syrup, vanilla extract, and maple extract until just combined

Use a wooden spoon to hand mix baking soda, salt, vanilla, oat flour, and all-purpose flour into a dough

Scoop into cookies and bake for 10 minutes at 375. Remove from oven but leave on pan to continue baking until cool. 

Maple cookies pinterest image

Can Dogs Eat Maple Cookies? 

Lol okay so I use this website called answerthepublic.com and you can type in any word and it will tell you the most common questions people google about that word. So I typed in “maple cookies” and this was one of the most common questions??

I’m not quite sure what these humans are thinking, but I figured I’d humor them (as long as you promise to humor me!) 

Ummmm my guess is that dogs CAN eat maple cookies? But CAN does not equal SHOULD. I would advise you to keep the maple cookies away from your dog’s tummy, just to stay on the safe side. Lol, what the heck, internet. 

Anyways, you should make this recipe for maple cookies. And if you do, you should leave a comment letting me know what you thought!

And if you liked this recipe, you’ll also like: 

Maple Cookies

These maple cookies are literally heaven on a plate. They have the perfect taste of maple– not overpowering but definitely not negligible. The dough can be made in 10 minutes, there is no resting period, and the cookies bake for about 10 minutes in the oven. Can you think of anything more perfect in these beautiful fall months? I think not. 

Course Cookies, Dessert
Cuisine canada
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings 32 cookies

Ingredients

  • ½ cup butter mostly melted
  • ½ cup dark brown sugar
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • ¼ cup pure maple syrup
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp vanilla
  • 3/4-1 tsp maple flavoring depending on flavor preference
  • 1 cup oats or oat flour
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. If using oats instead of oat flour, simply use a blender or food processor to grind the oats into a powder… now you have oat flour!

  3. Melt butter almost completely. In the bowl of stand mixer (or with an electric mixer) cream the butter together with brown sugar and granulated sugar until just combined.
  4. Add egg and mix until just combined.
  5. Add maple syrup, vanilla extract, and maple extract and mix until just combined.
  6. Use a wooden spoon to hand-mix baking soda, salt, oat flour, and all purpose flour.

  7. Use a small cookie scoop to scoop out dough onto ungreased cookie sheet.
  8. Bake for 10 minutes.
  9. Remove from the oven and leave on the cookie sheet to continue cooking until cooled.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational and personal use only. 

Steak Stir Fry Recipe (Loc Lac from Cambodia)

Close up vertical image of steak stir fry with white rice

This Steak Stir Fry recipe comes from Cambodia and is called Loc Lac. It is made with chip steaks and a delicious stir fry marinade that brings so much flavor to the dish. This Steak Stir Fry recipe (Loc Lac) can be served with rice or on a bed of lettuce, tomatoes, and cucumbers.

Steak Stir Fry, or Loc Lac, is a really delicious recipe from Cambodia. Traditional Loc Lac is only beef with a stir fry marinade on it, which is then served on rice or a bed of lettuce and tomatoes. This recipe would also, however, be delicious with broccoli! I think I’m going to try this the next time I make this Loc Lac beef from Cambodia.

Which Steak for Stir Fry?

It took me a while to figure out what steak to use for this Steak Stir Fry recipe, but Momma Foreign Fork really came in handy when she mentioned chip steaks. I went to the Italian specialty grocery store down the street from my house and they had fresh chip steaks just waiting for me to take home to make Steak Stir Fry. Chip steaks should be available at most beef markets or butchers.

Chip steaks, also known as sizzle steaks, are a thin cut of beef that is shaved from the bottom round cuts of beef. It is also made from loins these days. Chip steaks are most well known for their role in the great Philly Cheese Steak. They cook quickly (like 5 minutes), but stay tender and absolutely delicious!

Steak Stir Fry

What’s in this Steak Stir Fry recipe?

  • Chip Steak
  • Soy Sauce
  • Oyster Sauce
  • Limes
  • Paprika
  • Ginger
  • Brown Sugar
  • Sesame Oil
  • Garlic
  • Cornstarch
  • Green Onions

For full recipe measurements and instructions, check the recipe card at the end of this post!

How to Cook the Steak Stir Fry Recipe

Cut the chip steaks into thin strips, and then cut the strips in half.

In a large bag, combine the soy sauce, oyster sauce, lime juice, paprika, ginger, and brown sugar with the chip steaks. Allow the chip steaks to sit in this marinade for at least 30 minutes but up to overnight.

Heat sesame oil in a frying pan over medium-high heat.

Add the garlic and allow to sizzle for a few minutes. Then pour the entire contents of your plastic bag into the frying pan, including the beef and all of the marinade.

Sir the chip steaks until they brown on both sides. The chip steaks are so thin that the minute they brown on each side, they’re ready to eat. If you cook them much longer than that, they will begin to toughen.

Once they brown, mix the cornstarch with a little bit of water and add it into the pan. Continue stirring the beef until the sauce starts to thicken from the cornstarch. Once the sauce is thick, remove the Steak Stir Fry from the pan and serve.

Pinterest Image for Steak Stir Fry

Serving your Loc Lac

Traditional Loc Lac is served over a bed of lettuce, tomatoes, and cucumbers, but this would also be delicious over a bed of rice. In Cambodia, Loc Lac is often also served with a lime dipping sauce on the side and normally with a fried egg on top. Adding these elements to the top of your Loc Lac is a delicious way to take your dish to the next level.

Serving with Noodles

If you want an even more outlandish way to serve this loc lac, you can do what Momma Foreign Fork did last week. I walked downstairs during lunch time to talk to her, and there she was with my Steak Stir Fry sitting on top of a bowl of spaghetti noodles… Apparently the lady knows what she’s doing, though, because that ish was DELICIOUS.

It’s not traditional in any way, shape, or form…. But it WAS yummy lol.

If you liked this Steak Stir Fry Recipe (Loc Lac), make sure to also check out:

If you make this recipe, make sure to post a photo on Instagram or Facebook with the hashtag #TheForeignFork and tag @TheForeignFork! And don’t forget to keep stopping by for more recipes from each country in the world.

5 from 1 vote
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Steak Stir Fry Recipe

This Steak Stir Fry recipe comes from Cambodia and is called Loc Lac. It is made with chip steaks and a delicious stir fry marinade that brings so much flavor to the dish. This Steak Stir Fry recipe (Loc Lac) can be served with rice or on a bed of lettuce, tomatoes, and cucumbers.

Course Main Course
Cuisine asian, cambodian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Resting Time 1 hour
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

Marinade

  • 2 tbsp Soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp Oyster sauce
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1/3 tsp Paprika
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 1 inch ginger peeled and grated
  • 2 tsp brown sugar
  • 1 Lb Chip steaks Cut into strips

Cooking

  • 2 tbsp sesame oil or any other oil if you have that instead
  • 1 tsp garlic
  • 2 tsp cornstarch
  • 1 tbsp water
  • Juice of another half of a lime
  • 2 stalks of green onion chopped

Instructions

  1. Mix all of the marinade ingredients together and leave them in a plastic bag with the steak for at least an hour.
  2. After the meat is done marinating, heat a medium-sized pan over medium heat.
  3. Fry the garlic in the oil, then add the meat and extra marinade to the pan.
  4. Cook until the beef is cooked almost entirely, about 5-7 minutes.
  5. In a separate, small bowl, mix tsp of cornstarch with 1 tbsp of water.
  6. Pour into the pan and continue stirring over medium heat.
  7. When the sauce has thickened squeeze another half of a lime on the loc lac and garnish with green onion. Stir for a minute more.
  8. Plate over lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, and with a side of rice if desired. Enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 

Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce from Brunei

Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce is a spectacular meal from Brunei. Chicken pieces are marinated in a Thai-flavored marinade and then grilled on a barbecue grill. They are then dipped in scrumptious peanut sauce to be enjoyed!

So here’s the story of my first barbecuing disaster. Are you ready? 

OKAY OKAY OKAY here we go. I know you probably all think I’m the all-time, master, best chef, and all-knowing cook in the entire world (L.O.L.) I hate to disappoint you, but sometimes it’s just not true. 

Like, for example, barbecuing! I’ve always been a liiiiittttllleeee scared of the barbeque grill. Whenever it comes time to cook something on the barbecue grill, I’ve always turned to good ‘ole daddy-o. Papa Foreign Fork is a pretty dece grill master, so he always takes over the actual grilling part. 

But this Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce was my very first grill recipe for The Foreign Fork, so I had to put on my big girl panties and try my own hand at grilling. Besides, Papa Foreign Fork can’t be my Grill Master forever. 

Close of up Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce

Barbecue Distaster

So I fire up the grill, put my chicken on their wooden skewers, and set to work on barbecuing. *Insert Blonde girl moment here* because I forgot that I put WOOD over FIRE. Sooooo my skewers caught fire, and by the time my chicken cooked through, the wooden sticks completely charred black. Duh…. 

So here’s a lesson for you all: Apparently when you cook skewers on the barbeque, you need to soak your wooden skewers in water for a few hours before you put them on the grill. 

The best part about this blog is that I get to learn with every single meal that I cook. I’m not a perfect chef by any means, but as I continue on my culinary journey around the world, I learn and I learn and I learn. And never again will I put unsoaked skewers on the barbecue. 

What is Satay? 

Satay is a popular dish in Southeast Asia made of meat of grilled meat on a skewer, most of the time served with a sauce. It can be made of multiple ingredients including mutton, beef, pork, fish, and in our case, today, chicken! 

Satay origininated from the Indonesian island of Java; it is an adaptation of Indian kebabs. The name comes from Malay, but in a Xiamen dialect it means “three times stacked” because usually satay is made of three pieces of meat stacked together on a Kebab skewer. 

While our satay today is made with wooden or metal skewers, in Brunei and Indonesia, Satay is more commonly made with bamboo skewers! 

Brunei Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce

This chicken satay with peanut sauce is so tender and savory. And it’s only a few easy steps!

Whisk the marinade together. Cut the chicken into cubes and leave to rest in the marinade for a few hours. Put the chicken on skewers and cook on the barbecue grill. Whisk together the peanut sauce, and BOOM! Done! 

Try it and enjoy 😉 

If you make this recipe and love it, take a photo and share it on instagram and facebook! Just make sure to tag @TheForeignFork and hashtag #TheForeignFork. If you liked this recipe, you’ll also love this Qofte from Albania and this Wiener Schnitzel from Austria. Thanks for stopping by! I’ll see you next week.

Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce

Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce is a spectacular meal from Brunei. Chicken pieces are marinated in a Thai-flavored marinade and then grilled on a barbecue grill. They are then dipped in scrumptious peanut sauce to be enjoyed!

Course dinner, Main Course, meat
Cuisine brunei
Cook Time 20 minutes
Marinade Time 2 hours
Servings 20 skewers

Ingredients

  • 2.5 lb boneless skinless chicken thighs

Marinade Ingredients

  • ½ cup coconut milk
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp curry powder
  • ¼ tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp chopped garlic
  • ¼ tsp ground ginger
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp lime juice

Peanut Sauce Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup peanut butter
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tsp ginger
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1/2 tsp chili paste to taste
  • 1 tsp Apple cider vinegar
  • 1/3 cup water or more depending on desired thickness

Instructions

  1. If you are using wooden skewers, soak the skewers in water overnight before you cook the recipe.
  2. Trim the fat from the chicken thighs. Cut into about 1 inch cubes.
  3. Combine the marinade ingredients in a small bowl.
  4. In a gallon ziplock bag, add the cubed chicken pieces and pour the marinade. Put the ziplock bag in the fridge and let rest for about 2 hours or overnight.
  5. Once the chicken has marinated, place three cubed pieces side by side on the wooden skewer. Make sure to skewer the chicken the long way.
  6. Use a pastry brush to brush olive oil on your barbecue grill to keep the chicken from sticking.
  7. Heat the grill on a low heat, and slowly grill the satay about ten minutes on each side. Check the chicken frequently to ensure it isn’t burning. Chicken is completely cooked when it reaches an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit.
  8. While the chicken is cooking, whisk together the peanut sauce ingredients, adding more water according to desired thickness.
  9. Enjoy!
  10. Leave a comment on this post letting me know what you thought.

Recipe Notes

Recipe Copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational and personal use only. 

Tufahije from Bosnia and Herzegovina

Tufahije from Bosnia and Herzegovina

Tufahije from Bosnia and Herzegovina is very similar to a deconstructed apple pie. The apples are poached, filled with a brown sugar and walnut filling, and then topped with whipped cream. MMM MMM MMM. 

Apple pie is awesome, right? Obviously. Duh. There’s no denying that at all. But sometimes I feel bad for poor, little apple pie. Everyone loves her in October… she’s the lady of the hour in November. But by the time summer rolls around, when cuffing season has ended and everyone has moved on to the sweeter summer fruits, apple pie is left in the dust. 

But why? Why must we dessert (hehe pun intended) apple pie? Perhaps it’s because it suddenly seems too heavy, too rich for the beautiful summer air. 

Well, surprise, people; you’re in luck. I’ve created a recipe for a deconstructed apple pie inspired by Tufahija from Bosnia and Herzegovina. In this recipe, each apple is it’s own mini pie, sans crust. The apples are hollowed out and filled with a brown sugar and walnut filling that is to die for! 

The classifying factor that makes this recipe similar to a classic Tufahije is the poaching of the apples. First, you will peel the apples and hollow them out. Then you’ll boil them in a water and sugar combination on the stove. Once the apples cool in the fridge, you will cook the brown sugar filling on the stove. 

Then comes the best part. Spoon that wonderful, sweet, caramel filling into the hollowed apples. Viola! Your tufahija is complete! You can also top your apples with ice cream or whipped cream for a little added pizzazz. 

Poached apples filled with walnuts and brown sugar

A Word of Warning

Do not over boil your apples. The first time I made this recipe, I thought that the apples looked done, but decided to give them an extra few minutes in the pot. To my dismay, the next time I opened the lid to the pot and peered inside, all of my apples were bottomless!

If the apples cook for too long in the liquid, the bottoms will explode. This will make it very hard to fill the apples, and we DEFINITELY don’t want that wonderful caramel filling spilling all over the floor. So take some extra caution and try to steer away from cooking the apples for longer than the recommended 5 minutes on each side. 

Classic Tufahije

Admittedly, this recipe for Tufahije is a bit different than the classic recipes that are popular in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The filling in the Tufahije tends to be a bit lighter than the filling featured here. Typically, it consists of walnuts mixed with milk to soften them. This is then combined with sugar and stuffed into the apples. 

Upon experimenting with this method in my house, my family decided a few things… We didn’t like the texture of the raw walnuts, and we also wanted the filling to be warm. Instead of just heating up milk on the stove, I chose to add brown sugar, and, alas, The Foreign Fork version of Tufahije was born! 

Did you make this dessert? Did you love it? Don’t forget to take a photo and share it on Facebook and Instagram and tag @TheForeignFork or hashtag #TheForeignFork. And if you liked this recipe, you’ll also like these Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Sauce from Benin or maybe these Waffles from Belgium. Take a peek around my site, and let me know what you think in the comments below! Thanks for stopping by!  

Tufahije (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

Tufahija from Bosnia and Herzegovina is very similar to a deconstructed apple pie. The apples are poached, filled with a brown sugar walnut filling, and then topped with whipped cream. MMM MMM MMM.

Course Dessert, fruit
Cuisine Bosnia and Herzegovina
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Chill Time 54 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

Syrup Ingredients

  • 4 granny smith apples
  • 2.5 cups of sugar
  • 4 cups water
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • Peel of one apple

Filling Ingredients

  • ½ cup walnuts chopped very finely
  • ¼ brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • ¼ cup honey flavored greek yogurt

Instructions

  1. Peel each apple. Reserve the peel from one apple.
  2. Using a spoon (a grapefruit spoon is a great tool, if you have one!), carefully dig out a hole in the center of each apple. This process is similar to coreing the apple, but take care not to make the hole come out of both sides. Create a bowl, not a tunnel, in the apple.
  3. In a pot on the stove, bring the water to a boil. Once the water is boiling, add the rest of the syrup ingredients, and stir until the sugar completely dissolves.
  4. Add the peeled, hollowed apples to the syrup mixture. Cover the pot, and cook for about 5 minutes. Using tongs, flip the apples over, and cook the other side for about 5 minutes as well. Make sure that the apples are soft enough to stick a fork through, but not so soft that the bottoms will fall out.
  5. One cooked, remove the apples from the liquid. Allow them to cool in the fridge for about 30 minutes.
  6. Heat a separate, small pot over medium-high heat. Add all of the filling ingredients to the pot. Stir frequently until the mixture begins to bubble. Once it starts to bubble, cook for about 4-5 minutes until it thickens.
  7. Spoon this mixture into the hollow, chilled apples. Top with whipped cream or ice cream and enjoy!
  8. Leave a comment on this page letting me know what you thought of your Tufahije.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 


Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Sauce from Benin

caramelized-bananas

Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Sauce are a spectacular dessert from Benin. They can be enjoyed solo, but my favorite way to devour them is on top of chocolate ice cream. The original concept for this Beninese classic is to caramelize the bananas in orange juice, but I put a special spin on the recipe. Let me know in the comments below what you think!

It’s May, and it’s officially spring, and although the sky seems to forget it sometimes, its supposed to be warm out. Michigan, of course, doesn’t always follow the rules. But warm is how it’s supposed to be, if everything goes as planned.

If everything goes as planned, then also, ice cream season is just around the corner. Okay, okay, if you’re anything like me… ice cream season is EVERY season. There are some crazies out there that only like to eat ice cream when it’s warm out. I can’t relate to those people, but I have some good news for them:

caramelized bananas with ice cream scoop

Caramelized Bananas as An Ice Cream Topping

These Beninese Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Juice are THE BEST ICE CREAM TOPPINGS EVER. No exaggeration.

Sorry for screaming at you, but I needed you to understand. You get it now, right? Best. Topping. Ever.

How to Make Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Juice

Pineapple juice and brown sugar mix together and heat on the stove to create a delicious sauce. Then, right before it’s done, add the bananas in and caramelize them right up. If you have a sweet tooth, this is the treat for you. I chose Dole Pineapple Juice as my pineapple juice of choice!

Caramelized bananas with cast iron

Orange Juice vs Pineapple Juice

The traditional method for this treat in Benin is actually caramelized bananas in orange sauce. You’re welcome to make this recipe with whatever fruit juice you’d prefer, and the same ratios should work just fine. Use fresh squeezed orange juice to be traditional, pineapple juice to be like me, or go off the rails and try something else! You’re going to like it no matter what. 

caramelized bananas in a bowl

Boiling Your Brown Sugar

Brown sugar syrup is a little difficult to master on the stove. If you let this syrup boil for too long (like I did the first time), the brown sugar will harden into almost a candy… Then the bananas will be caught in a sweet, sugary casing, and harden onto the ice cream… not ideal.

spoonful of caramelized bananas

Make sure to pay attention that your brown sugar boils the right way. You’ll want it to simmer very low for about 15 minutes and then plop the bananas in just to warm them through. Any longer and they won’t be as enjoyable.

If you tried these Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Juice and loved them, post a photo on Facebook or Instagram and tag @TheForeignFork or hashtag #TheForeignFork! Leave a comment telling me how they were! If you liked this recipe, make sure to also check out this Strawberry Kissel from Belarus or these Tropical Stuffed Avocados from Barbados.

caramelized bananas with ice cream scoop
5 from 1 vote
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Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Sauce

Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Sauce are a spectacular dessert from Benin. They can be enjoyed solo, but my favorite way to devour them is on top of chocolate ice cream. The original concept for this Beninese classic is to caramelize the bananas in orange juice, but I put a special spin on the recipe. Let me know in the comments below what you think!

Course Dessert
Cuisine benin
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings 2 servingss

Ingredients

  • 2 large bananas
  • 1 6 oz can Dole Pineapple juice
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • ¼ tsp vanilla

Instructions

  1. Put all ingredients besides bananas in the pan. Simmer for 15 minutes.
  2. Peel bananas and slice in half vertically. Add bananas into the sauce and cook for another 2 minutes, until the bananas are warmed through

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only.