Tufahije from Bosnia and Herzegovina

Tufahije from Bosnia and Herzegovina

Tufahije from Bosnia and Herzegovina is very similar to a deconstructed apple pie. The apples are poached, filled with a brown sugar and walnut filling, and then topped with whipped cream. MMM MMM MMM. 

Apple pie is awesome, right? Obviously. Duh. There’s no denying that at all. But sometimes I feel bad for poor, little apple pie. Everyone loves her in October… she’s the lady of the hour in November. But by the time summer rolls around, when cuffing season has ended and everyone has moved on to the sweeter summer fruits, apple pie is left in the dust. 

But why? Why must we dessert (hehe pun intended) apple pie? Perhaps it’s because it suddenly seems too heavy, too rich for the beautiful summer air. 

Well, surprise, people; you’re in luck. I’ve created a recipe for a deconstructed apple pie inspired by Tufahija from Bosnia and Herzegovina. In this recipe, each apple is it’s own mini pie, sans crust. The apples are hollowed out and filled with a brown sugar and walnut filling that is to die for! 

The classifying factor that makes this recipe similar to a classic Tufahije is the poaching of the apples. First, you will peel the apples and hollow them out. Then you’ll boil them in a water and sugar combination on the stove. Once the apples cool in the fridge, you will cook the brown sugar filling on the stove. 

Then comes the best part. Spoon that wonderful, sweet, caramel filling into the hollowed apples. Viola! Your tufahija is complete! You can also top your apples with ice cream or whipped cream for a little added pizzazz. 

Poached apples filled with walnuts and brown sugar

A Word of Warning

Do not over boil your apples. The first time I made this recipe, I thought that the apples looked done, but decided to give them an extra few minutes in the pot. To my dismay, the next time I opened the lid to the pot and peered inside, all of my apples were bottomless!

If the apples cook for too long in the liquid, the bottoms will explode. This will make it very hard to fill the apples, and we DEFINITELY don’t want that wonderful caramel filling spilling all over the floor. So take some extra caution and try to steer away from cooking the apples for longer than the recommended 5 minutes on each side. 

Classic Tufahije

Admittedly, this recipe for Tufahije is a bit different than the classic recipes that are popular in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The filling in the Tufahije tends to be a bit lighter than the filling featured here. Typically, it consists of walnuts mixed with milk to soften them. This is then combined with sugar and stuffed into the apples. 

Upon experimenting with this method in my house, my family decided a few things… We didn’t like the texture of the raw walnuts, and we also wanted the filling to be warm. Instead of just heating up milk on the stove, I chose to add brown sugar, and, alas, The Foreign Fork version of Tufahije was born! 

Did you make this dessert? Did you love it? Don’t forget to take a photo and share it on Facebook and Instagram and tag @TheForeignFork or hashtag #TheForeignFork. And if you liked this recipe, you’ll also like these Caramelized Bananas in Pineapple Sauce from Benin or maybe these Waffles from Belgium. Take a peek around my site, and let me know what you think in the comments below! Thanks for stopping by!  

Tufahije (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

Tufahija from Bosnia and Herzegovina is very similar to a deconstructed apple pie. The apples are poached, filled with a brown sugar walnut filling, and then topped with whipped cream. MMM MMM MMM.

Course Dessert, fruit
Cuisine Bosnia and Herzegovina
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Chill Time 54 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

Syrup Ingredients

  • 4 granny smith apples
  • 2.5 cups of sugar
  • 4 cups water
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • Peel of one apple

Filling Ingredients

  • ½ cup walnuts chopped very finely
  • ¼ brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • ¼ cup honey flavored greek yogurt

Instructions

  1. Peel each apple. Reserve the peel from one apple.
  2. Using a spoon (a grapefruit spoon is a great tool, if you have one!), carefully dig out a hole in the center of each apple. This process is similar to coreing the apple, but take care not to make the hole come out of both sides. Create a bowl, not a tunnel, in the apple.
  3. In a pot on the stove, bring the water to a boil. Once the water is boiling, add the rest of the syrup ingredients, and stir until the sugar completely dissolves.
  4. Add the peeled, hollowed apples to the syrup mixture. Cover the pot, and cook for about 5 minutes. Using tongs, flip the apples over, and cook the other side for about 5 minutes as well. Make sure that the apples are soft enough to stick a fork through, but not so soft that the bottoms will fall out.
  5. One cooked, remove the apples from the liquid. Allow them to cool in the fridge for about 30 minutes.
  6. Heat a separate, small pot over medium-high heat. Add all of the filling ingredients to the pot. Stir frequently until the mixture begins to bubble. Once it starts to bubble, cook for about 4-5 minutes until it thickens.
  7. Spoon this mixture into the hollow, chilled apples. Top with whipped cream or ice cream and enjoy!
  8. Leave a comment on this page letting me know what you thought of your Tufahije.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 


Cevapi from Bosnia and Herzegovina

How to Make Cevapi

Cevapi are flavorful sausage kebabs from Bosnia and Herzegovina. They are made from a savory blend of minced beef and lamb meat, and are grilled over a charcoal flame. Try this easy and delicious Cevapi recipe for your next barbecue!

What are Cevapi?

Cevapi are kind of like… oblong meatball sausage kebabs that are traditionally cooked on a grill. They’re the national dish in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and after making them and eating them, I can see why.

They remind me of Qofte – Albanian Meatballs – one of the first global recipes I tried making myself after falling in love with the original dish.

Flavorful, slightly crisp on the outside and juicy on the inside, it’s impossible to just eat one of these savory, meaty morsels. It’s no wonder why they are typically served on skewers with a few pieces of Cevapi on each!

What Ingredients Do You Need to Make This Recipe?

Easily make my Cevapi recipe using just a handful of simple ingredients that can be found at any grocery store.

Here is what you need:

  • Ground beef
  • Ground lamb
  • Seasonings – salt, pepper, onion powder, and paprika
  • Onion
  • Olive oil
Close up of Cevapi

So I learned something about myself while cooking the Cevapi for this meal: I have literally zero idea how to use a charcoal grill. I learned this too little too late, while I was outside trying to grill meat over uncooked coals.

Luckily, though, Papa Foreign Fork came to the rescue. I thought I was Miss Magic when I sprayed my charcoal with lighter fluid and then set a lighter to it and little baby flames started popping up everywhere. If you follow me on my Instagram page, you witnessed the pure joy that I felt at my “success.” 

Half of you were probably laughing at me from behind your phones, because my fire was NOT a success. I didn’t realize my mistake until my dad came to visit me on the porch. 

“Are you trying to cook over those…?” he asked with a laugh, obviously comically disappointed in his daughter’s lack of campfire knowledge. “You’ll never cook anything over that.”

Get the Full Cevapi Recipe Below. Enjoy!

How to Make Cevapi from Bosnia

Tip: How to Start a Charcoal Fire

Turns out, I hadn’t really listened to my dad’s instructions. Big mistake.

When you start cooking over charcoals, pile the charcoal pieces up into one big hill of charcoal. The more vertical the better. Once the charcoal is piled high, spray it with lighter fluid and then allow it to sit for a second so that all of the lighter fluid soaks into the stones. As soon as it all soaks in, give the charcoal pieces another good spray with the lighter fluid. Let the lighter fluid soak in once more. 

Okay, here’s where I went wrong. Before even lighting the charcoal pieces on fire, I shook them out of their pyramidal position. DO NOT DO THIS LOL. Keep the charcoal in their pile, and light them with a match. They should go up in flames quickly. 

Leave them to cook like this for about 10-15 minutes, fanning the flames every time the coals cool down. Once about 50% of the charcoal pieces start to turn ashy, THEN shake the grill until they turn flat. NOW you can start cooking on your charcoals! Viola! You’re a pro. 

How to Serve and Eat Cevapi?

In Bosnia and Herzegovina, it’s not abnormal to order a plate of either 10, 15 or 20 Cevapi, depending on how hungry you are.

The plate will be brought out with pita bread and raw onions. To eat it, form a pocket in the middle of the pita bread and place the Cevapi and raw onions inside.

For a low-carb option, try Cevapi served right on a bed of fresh greens, with onions and any other veggies you like.

Enjoy!

Cevapi (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

Cevapi are flavorful sausage kebabs from Bosnia and Herzegovina. They are made from a savory blend of minced beef and lamb meat, and are grilled over a charcoal flame.

Course Main Course, meat
Cuisine Bosnia and Herzegovina, european
Keyword cevapi, kebab
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings 24 Cevapi

Ingredients

  • 1 lb ground beef
  • ½ lb ground lamb
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • 2.5 tsp onion powder
  • 1.5 tsp paprika
  • ½ sweet onion chopped
  • 1 tbsp olive oil

Instructions

  1. In a medium pan, heat up 1 tbsp of olive oil. Add the chopped onion to the pan, and sautee until translucent. This should take about 5 minutes.
  2. In a bowl, use your hands to combine all of the ingredients together, including the cooked onions.

  3. Cover and let sit in the fridge for about 3 hours. When ready to cook, form into long sausage-shaped patties, and run 3-4 onto bamboo skewers. TIP: Soak your skewers in water before putting Cevapi onto them and cooking; the water will help to keep the skewers from burning on the grill.

  4. Heat up a charcoal grill and grill the Cevapi until cooked to desired doneness. You may also pan fry the Cevapi or cook on an indoor, electric grill.

  5. Enjoy!

Recipe Notes

  • Leftovers can be kept in an airtight container and stored in the fridge for up to 3-4 days.

 

Let me know in the comments if you give this recipe a try!

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 


Did you like this Cevapi recipe? Post a photo of your Cevapi creation on Facebook or Instagram and tag @TheForeignFork or hashtag #TheForeignFork.

Don’t forget to come back each week for more recipes from around the world! 

Looking for More Savory Dishes?


Burek from Bosnia and Herzegovina

Burek is an AWESOME dish from Bosnia and Herzegovina made by rolling lamb meat into layers of filo dough. It is buttery, homey, and, above all, delicious. Plus, the experience of making Burek is so fun that you’ll want to make it over and over again.

I won’t lie to you people. This week’s recipe is a challenge. But it’s the most delicious challenge I’ve ever encountered in my life. Cooking the meat for the Burek is easy peasy lemon squeezy. Saute some garlic, saute some onions, add some meat and seasonings, and leave it to brown. On a scale of 1 to brain surgery, that part is like a –3. Anyone can do it!

The rolling of the Burek is the tricky part, but it’s also the FUN part. And here’s a secret for you… I know you can do it!!

Overhead shot of lamb and filo dough roll-up

How Do I Roll My Burek?

Okay, so you’re gonna need to start with some frozen filo dough pastry from your grocery store. The sheets are very thin, so you need to be careful when handling them. They will rip easily when you pick them up, so move gently.

Line up three sheets of filo dough short end to short end to make one looooong line of filo dough. Then recreate that process with two more layers of pastry sheets on top of the ones you had just laid out. This will be nine sheets of dough total: three lengthwise and three in height.

Now you’re going to brush some melted butter over the dough. Once you cook, drain, and cool the meat, lay it along the long edge of the buttered pastry sheets. Very carefully, roll the long edge of the sheets over the meat, and keep rolling until one long tube is formed. Then, coil the long tube of dough up into a spiral shape.

I tried as hard as I could to explain that, but if you still can’t figure out what I mean, check out the video posted above for some clarification.

Burek with slice missing-- vertical

What if My Dough Rips?

Well… I’ll give you some comfort here. There is no question as to if your dough is going to tear… I guarantee you that it will. When the dough rips, don’t worry about it! Just keep rolling as carefully as possible, and by the time you’re done, all of that rolling will cover up the rips with more layers of dough. The dough also melts together when it bakes, so any rips will be fixed once your Burek goes into the oven.

Then What?

Congrats! The tough part is done and you’ve handled it like a champ. Now all you need to do is brush the top of your coiled pastry with a whisked egg and then sprinkle it with sesame seeds. Pop it in the oven for about 25-30 minutes at 350 degrees.

BOOM. YA DID IT. And I’m so very proud of you.

Pinterest Graphic for Burek

Eating/Serving Your Burek

You’ll know the Burek is done when the egg wash on the top really starts to brown. Once you remove the Burek from the oven, cut it like you’d cut a pizza or a cake: into triangular slices. It can be eaten plain, or you can serve it with plain, non-flavored yogurt as a dipping sauce!

I can already hear the mmmm’s from here.

Did you like this Burek recipe? Make sure to take a photo of it and share on Instagram or Facebook with the hashtag #TheForeignFork or tag @TheForeignFork. If you want to try more lamb recipes from The Foreign Fork, also check out this Algerian Sweet Lamb or this Lamb Pilaf (Kabuli Pulao) from Afghanistan! Please leave a comment if you tried making this! It would make my day.

Burek (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

Burek is an AWESOME dish from Bosnia and Herzegovina made by rolling lamb meat into layers of filo dough. It is buttery, homey, and, above all, delicious. Plus, the experience of making Burek is so fun that you’ll want to make it over and over again.

Course dinner, Main Course
Cuisine Bosnia and Herzegovina
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Stovetop Time 10 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 lb Ground lamb
  • 1 Onion chopped
  • 2 tbsp Olive oil
  • 1 tbsp Chopped garlic
  • ¾ tsp Salt
  • tsp Pepper
  • ½ tsp Paprika
  • tsp Allspice
  • 9 sheets of Filo dough one package will have more than enough. Thawed according to the package instructions
  • 4 tbsp Butter melted
  • Sesame seeds
  • 1 Egg whisked
  • Plain non-flavored yogurt, for serving

Instructions

Cooking the Meat

  1. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat, and add 2 tbsp of olive oil. When the oil is heated, add the garlic. Cook for about two minutes, until fragrant.
  2. Add the chopped onion. Cook for about five minutes, until the onions turn translucent.

  3. Add the lamb into the pan. Use your spatula to break apart the meat, so that it begins to brown in smaller chunks. As the meat begins to brown, add the salt, pepper, paprika, and allspice. Continue cooking until the meat browns all the way through.
  4. Drain the excess liquid from the browned meat. Transfer to a bowl, cover, and place in the fridge for about 10-15 minutes to bring the meat to room temperature.

Assembling the Burek

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Once the meat is cooled, it is time to begin assembling your Burek. Very carefully lay three sheets of filo dough short edge to short edge on the counter. Place the sheets so that they line up in one long sheet. Make sure to overlap the ends slightly.

  3. Once the first layer of dough is on the counter, repeat the process with two more layers of dough. Place the next 3 sheets directly over each of the first three sheets. Repeat one more time. By the end, your filo dough should be three sheets long and three layers high.
  4. Melt the butter and use a pastry brush to brush a layer of butter over the top layer of dough.
  5. Take handfuls of meat, and lay it along the long edge of the buttered pastry sheets. Very carefully roll the long edge of the sheets over the meat, and keep rolling until one long tube is formed. Work carefully, but it is okay if your dough rips. Keep rolling!

  6. Fold one edge of the long coil in on itself and continue coiling until the long tube of dough ends up in a spiral shape.
  7. Using your pastry brush again, brush a layer of the whisked egg on the top of your Burek. Then sprinkle the top with a generous layer of sesame seeds.
  8. Transfer your Burek to a parchment paper-lined cookie sheet and place in the oven for 25-30 minutes. You will know your Burek is done when the egg wash on the top begins to brown.

Serving

  1. To serve your Burek, cut it the same way you’d cut a pizza or a cake: into triangular slices. You can serve your Burek with plain, non-flavored yogurt as a dipping sauce! Enjoy!
  2. If you want more clarification on these assembly instructions, watch the Youtube video at the top of this blog post.

  3. Leave a review/comment on this post telling me about your experience cooking your Burek.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only.