Swiss Roll Recipe with Raspberry Cream Filling

swiss roll recipe with raspberry cream

Swiss Rolls are such a fun and impressive dessert to make! Swiss cakes are made from a very thin sponge cake that are filled with cream. In this case, our Swiss Roll Recipe features a raspberry flavored cream that both fills the cake and is spread on top. 

Surprisingly, Swiss Roll cakes did not originate in Switzerland, though they are from Central Europe somewhere! I guess this problem is very similar to how French Fries are actually from Belgium

It is guessed that this type of cake actually originated in Austria. They’re crazy about cake over there! Swiss Roll cakes in Austria are normally filled with cream, either flavored or not. There are other versions of this cake, however. Ones in America are often filled with jelly, whereas there are South American versions that are filled with Dulce de Leche

Whichever way you choose to fill them, you’re going to love this Swiss Roll Recipe! If you’d prefer to use a different type of berry for your recipe, feel free to swap out the raspberries for whatever you want.

What Ingredients are In this Swiss Roll Recipe? 

Ingredients for the Swiss Roll 

Cake flour sifted
Granulated Sugar
Eggs
Vanilla
Salt

Ingredients for the Raspberry Filling 

Raspberries
Sugar 
Water 
Cornstarch 
Heavy Whipping Cream 
Powdered Sugar 
Vanilla 

Raspberry Roll recipe with raspberry cream

How to Make this Swiss Roll Recipe

How to Make the Swiss Roll

Heat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
Crisco a sheet pan, then cut a piece of parchment paper into the shape of the pan and lay it down on the bottom. Crisco the parchment paper and dust with flour.
Separate egg yolks from egg whites.
In a large bowl, combine the egg yolks and ¾ cup caster sugar. Beat with an electric mixer until mixture becomes pale and thick, about 3 to 5 minutes. Beat in vanilla and salt.
In the bowl of a stand mixer (if possible, or with a hand mixer if not) beat the egg whites until soft peaks form. Add 2 tbsp sugar. Beat again until stiff peaks form.
Fold your yolk mixture into the egg whites with a rubber spatula or wooden spoon. Take care to mix the ingredients, as you don’t want to stir the egg whites too roughly or they will deflate.
Once the eggs are mixed together, sift the cake flour over the eggs and fold gently to combine.
Put batter into the prepared pan and place in the oven.
Bake cake for 15 to 20 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean when stuck into the middle of the cake.

Follow the instructions below for how to roll a Swiss Roll

How to Make the Filling 

In a saucepan with a heavy bottom, heat the raspberries and the granulated sugar over medium heat until the raspberries release their juices and they begin to boil slightly. This should take about 7 or so minutes. Stir so as not to burn. 

Once the raspberries are at a low boil, mix the water and the cornstarch together in a small bowl. Pour into the pot. Continue stirring the raspberries over the heat until they form the consistency of slightly watery jam. They will thicken up in the fridge. This should take about 4 minutes. 

Once the desired consistency is reached, put the jam in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. 

In the bowl of a stand mixer or with an electric hand mixer, add the cream, powdered sugar, and vanilla. Mix on high until a thick whipped cream is formed. This will take about 3-5 minutes. 

Once cooled enough, remove the jam from the fridge and lightly fold it into the cream, reserving about ¼ of the jam. 

Split the raspberry cream in half. One half is for the filling. One half is for the topping. Store in the fridge until you are ready to use it. 

How Do You Roll a Swiss Roll? 

Making sure that you roll your Swiss Roll correctly is very important. When you remove your Swiss Roll from the oven, let it rest for about 5 minutes, but NO LONGER. As soon as it is cool to touch, lay a dish towel (at least as large as your cake) out on the counter. 

Turn your cake over to remove it from its baking tray. Peel the parchment paper from the bottom. Then, roll the cake up WITH the dish towel, so that the dish towel is between all of the layers of the cake, and the cake is not touching itself. 

Rolling the cake up with the towel allows the cake to cool in the shape you want it to later take. This forms kind of a “muscle memory” in the cake, so that when you roll it with filling later, it will not crack. Allow the cake to cool completely.

Once the cake is completely cooled, unroll the cake. Spread the reserved raspberry jam across the bottom of the cake, then spread on the half of the cream mixture you reserved for the interior. Re-roll the cake without the dish towel. Then spread the remaining raspberry cream on top of the cake. 

swill roll recipe

Do I need a Swiss Roll Tin? 

A Swiss Roll tin in a large and shallow tin used to bake the sponge cake for Swiss Rolls. It is normally less than an inch deep and 9×13 inches wide with a smooth bottom. 

If you do not have a Swiss Roll tin, you do not need to go out and buy one. Make sure that you bake your cake in a light-colored colored cookie sheet that has edges. As long as you line the bottom of the cookie sheet, this should work just fine. 

I use a light-colored cookie sheet that is 1 inch deep and 12×17 in dimension, and it works perfectly for me! You can also use a 9×13 cookie sheet. 

Can I Freeze my Cake? 

Yes! Just as with a normal cake, Swiss Rolls last in the fridge for quite some time. My recommendation would be to make sure that you keep your Swiss Roll is in the fridge for no longer than 2-3 months for maximum freshness. However, it will keep a bit longer. 


Make sure to thaw your Swiss roll completely before cutting into it. You can do this for leaving it in the fridge overnight before serving. 

Thank you for reading! Did you enjoy this Swiss Roll Recipe with Raspberry Filling? If so, make sure to take a photo and post it on Instagram or Facebook with the hashtag #TheForeignFork and tag @TheForeignFork! And don’t forget to leave a comment on the bottom of this post letting me know what you thought!

If you liked this recipe, don’t forget to check out the other yummy cake recipes on my website: 

Swiss Roll with Raspberry Cream

Swiss Rolls are such a fun and impressive dessert to make! Swiss cakes are made from a very thin sponge cake that are filled with cream. In this case, our Swiss Roll Recipe features a raspberry flavored cream that both fills the cake and is spread on top. 

Course cake, Dessert
Cuisine austrian, swiss
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings 10 servings

Ingredients

Swiss Roll Recipe Ingredients

  • 1 cup Cake flour sifted
  • ¾ cup sugar Superfine sugar caster sugar + 2 tbsp
  • 5 Eggs
  • 1.5 tsp Vanilla
  • ¼ tsp Salt

Raspberry Filling Ingredients

  • 6 oz Raspberries
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tbsp + 1 tsp water
  • 2 tsp cornstarch
  • 1 1/3 cup cream
  • 6 tbsp powdered sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • To Bake the Cake

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Crisco a sheet pan, then cut a piece of parchment paper into the shape of the pan and lay it down on the bottom. Crisco the parchment paper and dust with flour.
  3. Separate egg yolks from egg whites.
  4. In a large bowl, combine the egg yolks and ¾ cup sugar. Beat with an electric mixer until mixture becomes pale and thick, about 3 to 5 minutes. Beat in vanilla and salt.

  5. In the bowl of a stand mixer (if possible, or with a hand mixer if not) beat the egg whites until soft peaks form. Add 2 tbsp sugar. Beat again until stiff peaks form.
  6. Fold your yolk mixture into the egg whites with a rubber spatula or wooden spoon. Take care to mix the ingredients, as you don’t want to stir the egg whites too roughly or they will deflate.
  7. Once the eggs are mixed together, sift the cake flour over the eggs and fold gently to combine.
  8. Put batter into the prepared pan and place in the oven.
  9. Bake cake for 15 to 20 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean when stuck into the middle of the cake.

To Make the Filling:

  1. In a saucepan with a heavy bottom, heat the raspberries and the granulated sugar over medium heat until the raspberries release their juices and they begin to boil slightly. This should take about 7 or so minutes. Stir so as not to burn.
  2. Once the raspberries are at a low boil, mix the water and the cornstarch together in a small bowl. Pour into the pot. Continue stirring the raspberries over the heat until they form the consistency of slightly watery jam. They will thicken up in the fridge. This should take about 4 minutes.
  3. Once the desired consistency is reached, put the jam in the fridge for at least 30 minutes.
  4. In the bowl of a stand mixer or with an electric hand mixer, add the cream, powdered sugar, and vanilla. Mix on high until a thick whipped cream is formed. This will take about 3-5 minutes.
  5. Once cooled enough, remove the jam from the fridge and lightly fold it into the cream, reserving about ¼ of the jam.
  6. Split the raspberry cream in half. One half is for the filling. One half is for the topping. Store in the fridge until you are ready to use it.

To Roll the Cake

  1. Making sure that you roll your Swiss Roll correctly is very important. When you remove your Swiss Roll from the oven, let it rest for about 5 minutes, but NO LONGER. As soon as it is cool to touch, lay a dish towel (at least as large as your cake) out on the counter.
  2. Turn your cake over to remove it from its baking tray. Peel the parchment paper from the bottom. Then, roll the cake up WITH the dish towel, so that the dish towel is between all of the layers of the cake, and the cake is not touching itself. Allow the cake to cool completely.

  3. Once the cake is completely cooled, unroll the cake. Spread the reserved raspberry jam across the bottom of the cake, then spread on the half of the cream mixture you reserved for the interior. Re-roll the cake without the dish towel. Then spread the remaining raspberry cream on top of the cake. Enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational and personal use only. 

Liptaur: An Austrian Cheese Spread

Liptaur Austrian Cheese Dip

Liptaur is a delicious cheese spread made with soft cheese mixed with paprika, onions, capers, chives, and beets. It is a unique take on a party dip, and  is best served with crackers, pretzels, or vegetables!

Liptaur Made with Quark Cheese

So…. quark cheese. That’s what we’re workin’ with this week. Quark (obviously) comes from Austria; It’s a soft cheese vaguely similar to American cream cheese! During Austria week, my co-chef Nick and I wandered the dairy aisle of many a grocery store in search of the elusive quark cheese. Finally, we found our treasure in the cheese section of Whole Foods. God, I love that place.

So, to be fair, I’m not really a Bavarian-flavored type of gal. I don’t really like sauerkraut or pickled things or dijon mustard or anything that has a fermented taste, so I was nervous about this dish. The dijon, pickled beets, and capers all made me a liiiiiittle uncomfy. But this dip was surprisingly delicious, and something I’m excited to share! And to top it off, its color is BEA-U-TI-FUL.

Substitution and Serving Suggestions

I’ve always loved beets, so I decided to add pickled beets to the recipe. If you’d prefer, you can also remove them or substitute in a different one of your favorite pickled vegetables. I provided vegetables, crackers, bread, and pretzels for my dipping plate, but the liptaur would also be delicious as a light spread on a sandwich!

Did you like this liptaur dip? Share a photo of it on Facebook and tag @theforeignfork and hashtag #theforeignfork! You should also check out my other recipes from Austria, here!

Liptuar (Austrian Cheese Spread)

Liptaur is a delicious cheese spread made with soft cheese mixed with paprika, onions, capers, chives, and beets. It is a unique take on a party dip, and is best served with crackers, pretzels, or vegetables! 

Course Appetizer
Cuisine austrian
Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 8 oz quark cheese
  • 1/2 tbsp paprika
  • 2 pickled beets diced
  • 1 tbsp capers
  • 4 stalks chives, with whites chopped
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 white onion chopped
  • 4 oz butter softened
  • 1/2 tbsp dijon mustard

Instructions

  1. Use and electric mixer to beat softened butter and quark cheese together. 

  2. Use a rubber spatula to mix in the rest of the ingredients. 

  3. Enjoy with pretzels, vegetables, bread, or crackers! 

Kaiserschmarrn (Austria): A Pancake Delight

Kaiserschmarrn is an Austrian dessert made of shredded up pancakes, topped with rum-soaked raisins, and served with a side of plum preserves. The sugar that coats the pancake caramelizes to make a sweet and delicious Austrian treat!

Remember how I went to Salzburg by myself? (If you don’t, click here to read about my Austrian adventure). Well, I’d been hearing about kaiserschmarrn— an Austrian dessert made of shredded pancakes– for the entire duration of my stay in Vienna, but I didn’t get the chance to try it.

Once I left my friends and was on my own in Salzburg, enjoying kaiserschmarrn was at the top of my to do list.

When I got into Salzburg, it was about 6:00 pm, so the day was pretty much gone. I had eaten some snacks on the train, so I wasn’t too hungry for dinner but my dessert stomach was growling all the same.

Immediately, I looked up the restaurant for the best kaiserschmarrn in Salzburg, and once I dropped my bags off at my hostel, I started my trek.

Should You Eat Kaiserschmarrn For Dinner?

It was an absolutely beautiful spring night in April, so I asked if I could sit on the patio at the restaurant. There weren’t any open tables available for me, but my waiter noticed that another girl was sitting by herself.

Without waiting for permission, my waiter asked the fellow solo traveller if I could eat a meal with her. The girl agreed, so we sat down to eat dinner together.

I sheepishly explained to the girl that I was ordering dessert for my dinner. A few minutes later, the waiter brought out what seemed like a delicious wiener schnitzel to my companion and to me he brought… enough dessert to feed a family of 5! The serving of kaiserschmarrn was massive!

Needless to say, we both had dessert for dinner that night.

What is Kaiserschmarrn?

It’s no secret that Austrians love their sweets. I mean, the whole country takes a break once a day to eat dessert for crying out loud! But kaiserschmarrn takes the love of sugar to a whole new level.

Kaiserschmarrn is a dessert from Austria, and it is absolutely delightful! It’s made by shredding pancakes in a skillet, and then topping them with rum-soaked raisins, jam, and powdered sugar.

To some Americans, I guess this dish could seem like breakfast. Go to a boujie enough brunch restaurant in Manhattan or something and it probably already is. You can enjoy it in the morning if you want… who am I to judge?!

But you can also serve it up for dessert, because, honestly, a pancake is great ANY time of day.

What Does Kaiserschmarrn Mean?

The word “kaiser” is German for “emperor,” and “schmarrn” means “mess.” The name is no joke!

Kaiserschmarrn sure does look like a mess, but myohmy is it a delicious mess. The pancakes are shredded up with a spatula or a knife to make them into small, bite-sized pieces.

close up of Kaiserschmarrn with plum jam

What Ingredients are in this Recipe?

Rum
Raisins
Flour
Salt
Sugar 
Vanilla extract
Milk
Lemon zest
Eggs
Butter
Powdered sugar
Plum preserves

How Do I Make this Recipe?

In a small bowl, soak the raisins in the rum until the rum is absorbed (about 15 minutes). 

Mix the egg yolk with vanilla, milk, lemon zest, and salt. Add flour and two tbsp of granulated sugar and mix well. 

Beat egg whites until stiff and fold them into the batter. 

Melt butter in pan that is large enough to fit all of the batter at once. The pancake should be fluffy, so make sure that the pan isn’t so large that the batter spreads too thin. 

Pour the batter into the pan, top with rum-soaked raisins, and then sprinkle with 1/2 tbsp granulated sugar. Cook until the bottom is brown. Flip the entire pancake over at once. 

Continue cooking pancake until the batter is cooked all the way through. Once cooked, leave the pancake in the pan but use a spatula or a knife to shred the pancake into uneven bites. 

Top the shredded pancake with powdered sugar and serve with a side of plum preserves. Serve warm in the pan.

Close up of Kaiserschmarrn in skillet

If you try this kaiserschmarrn, make sure to share a photo with me! Tag @TheForeignFork on Facebook or Instagram and #TheForeignFork to make sure that I can see 🙂 Come back soon!

Did you like this recipe? You should also try some of these other recipes I picked out just for you!

Kaiserschmarrn (Austria)

Kaiserschmarrn is an Austrian dessert made of shredded up pancakes, topped with rum-soaked raisins, and served with a side of plum preserves. The sugar that coats the pancake caramelizes to make a sweet and delicious Austrian treat!

Course Dessert
Cuisine austrian
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp Rum
  • 1/4 cup raisins
  • 1 cup flour
  • Pinch salt
  • 2 1/2 tbsp sugar divided
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • ¾ cup milk
  • zest of one lemon
  • 3 eggs separated
  • 2 tbsp Butter
  • powdered sugar for topping
  • Plum preserves for dipping

Instructions

  1. In a small bowl, soak the raisins in the rum until the rum is absorbed (about 15 minutes). 

  2. Mix the egg yolk with vanilla, milk, lemon zest, and salt. Add flour and two tbsp of granulated sugar and mix well. 

  3. Beat egg whites until stiff and fold them into the batter. 

  4. Melt butter in pan that is large enough to fit all of the batter at once. The pancake should be fluffy, so make sure that the pan isn’t so large that the batter spreads too thin. 

  5. Pour the batter into the pan, top with rum-soaked raisins, and then sprinkle with 1/2 tbsp granulated sugar. Cook until the bottom is brown. Flip the entire pancake over at once. 

  6. Continue cooking pancake until the batter is cooked all the way through. Once cooked, leave the pancake in the pan but use a spatula or a knife to shred the pancake into uneven bites. 

  7. Top the shredded pancake with powdered sugar and serve with a side of plum preserves. Serve warm in the pan. 

Wiener Schnitzel (Austria): A Meal of Meat

Wiener schnitzel is an Austrian main dish made with veal. The meat is pounded into thin slices, breaded, and fried and is then served with lemon wedges and greens for garnishment.  

When I think of food in Austria, the very first thing that comes to mind is wiener schnitzel. Guys, this stuff is EVERYWHERE (for good reason, though, so it’s okay). In every restaurant, on every dinner menu in Austria, wiener schnitzel is always an option. Maybe I was eating at places that catered to tourists? But from my experience, there wasn’t a restaurant that didn’t serve this Austrian specialty.

What is Wiener Schnitzel? 

Wiener schnitzel is a piece of veal that is pounded thin, breaded, and then fried. It’s normally served with a wedge of lemon, some greens for garnishment, and, occasionally, potato salad on the side.

Meat Only Please!

I’m not really a big meat person. I’ll never sit down to a restaurant and order a steak or a hamburger; I just don’t love those things like some people do! My favorite parts of the meal are always the sides… I really love me some vegetables and carbs.

I had heard such great things about wiener schnitzel so when I got to Austria, I knew I had to try it. But when I sat down for my first dinner in Vienna, I was reluctant to order the wiener schnitzel; I didn’t want to order a big plate of just meat. But I was in Austria, and that calls for tasting all that the country has to offer, so I sucked it up and ordered anyways.

Turns out, wiener schnitzel is really darn good. Of course I still would have loved having something delicious as a side (which is why if you make this recipe, you should also make this kasespatzle recipe— They go so well together). I was such a big fan, that when it came time to choose my Austrian menu, I decided to cook this dish again from home.

This is an incredibly quick and easy dish, and I was very pleased with how it turned out! If you want to experience all that Austria has to offer, definitely give this one a try.

Liked this recipe for Austrian wiener schnitzel? Try this recipe for Austrian sacher torte. If you cook this recipe, don’t forget to post a photo with the hashtag #theforeignfork!

Wiener Schnitzel (Austria)

Wiener schnitzel is an Austrian main dish made with veal. The meat is pounded into thin slices, breaded, and fried and is then served with lemon wedges and greens for garnishment.  

Course dinner
Cuisine austrian
Keyword veal
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 4 veal cutlets
  • 1 tbsp milk
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 1 cup plain bread crumbs
  • vegetable oil for frying
  • lemon slices for garnishment
  • parsley for garnishment

Instructions

  1. Use a meat tenderizer to beat the meat to 1/4 of an inch. This is very important, as it will keep your meat from tensing up as it gets hot.

  2. Combine the milk and the eggs and whisk together. 

  3. Put enough oil in the pan to come about halfway up the meat. Heat the oil until it reaches 350 degrees.

  4. Dip each of the cutlets into the flour. Then dip them into the egg and then the breadcrumbs to coat. 

  5. Put each cutlet in the pan (I fried them one at a time). Cook for about two minutes, flip, and then cook for about two minutes on the other side. 

  6. Remove wiener schnitzel from the oil and place on a paper towel lined plate to drain oil. 

  7. Squeeze lemon onto the meat and enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For personal or educational use only. 

Käsespätzle (Austria): Better than Mac and Cheese

Käsespätzle is an Austrian dish that combines spätzle and cheese sauce. The more delicious cousin of mac and cheese, käsespätzle is topped with onions and is delicious as either a side or a main dish. 

WOOOAAAHHHH baby. You gotta try this one.

Nothing’s better than a big bowl of creamy, delicious mac and cheese, right?

WRONG.

Mac and cheese is great, but, god, this käsespätzle blows any bowl of mac and cheese right out of the water. I don’t know what it is, really, but somehow spätzle in cheese sauce is just infinitely better than noodles in cheese sauce.

What is käsespätzle?

“What is spätzle?” you may ask. Spätzle are a type of German and Austrian dumpling made from flour, egg, and salt. I didn’t choose to make my own spätzle for this recipe (God bless Whole Foods). But if you do, it’s pretty easy. The dough needs to be pushed through holes to create the right shape. You can either use a spätzle maker if you’re super fancy or just a colander if you’re not.

käsespätzle on blue background

Once you form the spätzle, boil some water to to cook them. Grab 2-3 different kinds of cheese (I chose guyre, Emmentaler, and Jarlsberg) and shred them in a separate bowl. Once the spätzle cooks through, drain them and return them to the pot. Add the cheese and some milk and mix to combine into a creamy cheese sauce. In a separate pan, saute onion slices. When the spätzle and cheese sauce are evenly combined, add the onions to the pot for a nice finish.  

Next time you’re making mac and cheese for the fam, do a little extra investigating in the grocery aisle. If you can find spätzle in there, impulse buy that bag and go home to make yourself a creamy bowl of käsespätzle heaven. You don’t want to miss out on this one.

Liked these Austrian käsespätzle noodles? Then check out my recipe for Armenian Mantiabour (tortellini soup) or this Vegemite Pasta from Austria.

If you make this recipe (AS YOU SHOULD) and like it, share a photo on facebook or instagram with the hashtag #theforeignfork!


Käsespätzle (Austria): Spätzle with Cheese Sauce

Käsespätzle is an Austrian dish that combines spätzle and cheese sauce. The more delicious cousin of mac and cheese, käsespätzle is topped with onions and is delicious as either a side or a main dish. 

Course dinner
Cuisine austrian
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp butter
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 onion sliced thinly
  • 1/2 lb Spätzle (I used Bechtle brand spätzle)
  • 3/4 cup milk more depending on preference
  • .25 lb emmenthaler cheese shredded
  • .25 lb jarlsberg cheese shredded
  • .15 lb gruyere cheese shredded

Instructions

  1. Boil water in a large pot. Once water is boiled, add spätzle and cook for about 10-15 minutes or until cooked through. 

  2. In the meantime, heat the olive oil in a pan. Once heated, add sliced onions and sautee until cooked. Alternatively, deep fry the onions in the oil if you’d like a crispier topping. 

  3. Once spätzle is cooked through, drain the water and return the spätzle to the pot. 

  4. Add all of the cheese to the pot and add milk a little at a time. Mix until the cheese sauce becomes creamy, adding more milk as necessary. 

  5. Add most of the onions to the pot and combine into spätzle mixture. Use remaining onion to top spätzle. Enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 

Sacher Torte from Austria: The History of Coffee

Sacher Torte piece remove

Sacher torte is a dense chocolate cake that originated in Austria. The cake is cut into two or three layers and spread with apricot filling between each layer, and the tops and sides are coated in a chocolate ganache glaze. This cake is well known as a national favorite in Austria! 

Gather Round, Gather Round

Sit down, boys and girls, it’s story time.

Once upon a time, in a land far, far away (or close, I guess, depending on where you live when you read this…. Ah, the beauty of a global world) there lived a man named Jerzy Franciszek Kulczycki– try saying that 5 times fast.

Jerzy was an officer in Austria. He had just witnessed the Polish-Habsburg army (the army of what is now Austria) defeat the Ottoman Army (the army of what is now Turkey) and lift the Turkish siege of Vienna, Austria. In their fleet, the Ottoman army left behind some old sacks of brown, dried beans in Austria. Upon inspection, the Polish king Jan III Sobieski (of current day Austria) determined that the beans had no use, so he handed them over to our pal Jerzy.

Now, Jerzy was a man with both brawn AND brains. He had spent some time as a Turkish captive back in his day. As a result, he knew full-well that he had just been handed a very delicious (and lucrative) gift. He knew what to do to turn those ugly beans into a nearly magical potion. The moral? One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

Oh, by the way, we’re talking about coffee.

sacher torte with piece

Changing the History of Coffee

My man Jerzy takes credit for making those bitter beans taste more delicious by adding sugar and milk. In 1865, the very first coffee shop opened in Vienna. Since the day of its opening, coffee has impacted Viennese culture in an astounding way. Coffee houses provide an opportunity for human connection, a break from the stress of life, and a fantastic place to satisfy your sweet tooth. In the middle of a coffee shop, the magic of Vienna becomes most evident.

sacher torte piece alone

What Does This Have to Do with Sacher Torte? 

Sacher torte is a very popular recipe to enjoy alongside a delicious cup of coffee in Vienna. Sacher torte’s origin is an interesting story… Though there are many recipes that are unclear in origin, the sacher torte is not one of them. The large “sacher” written in chocolate on the top of the cake– and the fact that it shares a name with its creator– removes any doubt about who created the recipe.

Almost every coffee and cake shop features sacher torte on their menu, and for good reason. It is one of the most popular desserts in the country (alongside apfel strudel and kaiserschmarrn). The cake is dense and bittersweet. Filled with apricot jam and then covered in a chocolate glaze, this cake screams Vienna.

Did you like this Viennese sacher torte recipe? Check out the papaya pie from Antigua and Barbuda and these lamingtons from Australia. If you share a photo of your sacher torte on social media, tag #theforeignfork in your caption!

Austrian Sacher Torte

Sacher torte is a dense chocolate cake that originated in Austria. The cake is cut into two or three layers and spread with apricot filling between each layer, and the tops and sides are coated in a chocolate ganache glaze. This cake is well known as a national favorite in Austria!

Course Dessert
Cuisine austrian
Keyword cake
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 4 hours
Servings 10 servings

Ingredients

Cake

  • 10 ounces bittersweet chocolate chips
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2/3 cup unsalted butter softened
  • 8 eggs separated
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour

Apricot glaze

  • 1 cup apricot preserve
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice

Chocolate ganache

  • 2 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 8 ounces semisweet chocolate chopped (about 1 1/3 cups chocolate chips)
  • 2 tablespoons light corn syrup
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Butter and flour a 9-inch springform pan.
  2. Melt the chocolate in a double boiler or microwave; set aside.
  3. Beat the sugar and butter in a large bowl with a mixer until creamy.
  4. Add the egg yolks one at a time, blending after each addition. Add the vanilla.
  5. Fold in the chocolate and flour.
  6. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form. Fold them into the batter.
  7. Pour the batter into the prepared pan and bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Let cool in the pan for at least 1 hour.
  8. To make the apricot glaze, heat the apricot preserve with the lemon juice for few seconds in the microwave.
  9. Once completely cooled, using a long serrated knife, trim the top of the cake to level it. Cut the cake horizontally into two equal layers.
  10. Place the bottom layer in a cake stand. Brush the top of the cake layer with the apricot glaze.
  11. Place the second cake layer on top and brush again. Brush the top and sides of the cake with the remaining glaze. Let cool for about 10 minutes in open air.
  12. Make the chocolate ganache
  13. Melt the butter in a double boiler over medium-high heat. Add the chocolate and corn syrup and cook, stirring constantly, until the chocolate is melted. Remove from the heat, stir in the vanilla.
  14. Pour all of the warm chocolate ganache on top of the cake.
  15. Using an offset spatula, gently smooth the ganache over the cake, allowing it to run down the sides.
  16. Refrigerate until the ganache is completely set, at least 1 hour. Remove the cake from the refrigerator about 1 hour before serving.

Recipe Notes

Recipe from atreatsaffair.com