Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce from Brunei

Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce is a spectacular meal from Brunei. Chicken pieces are marinated in a Thai-flavored marinade and then grilled on a barbecue grill. They are then dipped in scrumptious peanut sauce to be enjoyed!

So here’s the story of my first barbecuing disaster. Are you ready? 

OKAY OKAY OKAY here we go. I know you probably all think I’m the all-time, master, best chef, and all-knowing cook in the entire world (L.O.L.) I hate to disappoint you, but sometimes it’s just not true. 

Like, for example, barbecuing! I’ve always been a liiiiittttllleeee scared of the barbeque grill. Whenever it comes time to cook something on the barbecue grill, I’ve always turned to good ‘ole daddy-o. Papa Foreign Fork is a pretty dece grill master, so he always takes over the actual grilling part. 

But this Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce was my very first grill recipe for The Foreign Fork, so I had to put on my big girl panties and try my own hand at grilling. Besides, Papa Foreign Fork can’t be my Grill Master forever. 

Close of up Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce

Barbecue Distaster

So I fire up the grill, put my chicken on their wooden skewers, and set to work on barbecuing. *Insert Blonde girl moment here* because I forgot that I put WOOD over FIRE. Sooooo my skewers caught fire, and by the time my chicken cooked through, the wooden sticks completely charred black. Duh…. 

So here’s a lesson for you all: Apparently when you cook skewers on the barbeque, you need to soak your wooden skewers in water for a few hours before you put them on the grill. 

The best part about this blog is that I get to learn with every single meal that I cook. I’m not a perfect chef by any means, but as I continue on my culinary journey around the world, I learn and I learn and I learn. And never again will I put unsoaked skewers on the barbecue. 

What is Satay? 

Satay is a popular dish in Southeast Asia made of meat of grilled meat on a skewer, most of the time served with a sauce. It can be made of multiple ingredients including mutton, beef, pork, fish, and in our case, today, chicken! 

Satay origininated from the Indonesian island of Java; it is an adaptation of Indian kebabs. The name comes from Malay, but in a Xiamen dialect it means “three times stacked” because usually satay is made of three pieces of meat stacked together on a Kebab skewer. 

While our satay today is made with wooden or metal skewers, in Brunei and Indonesia, Satay is more commonly made with bamboo skewers! 

Brunei Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce

This chicken satay with peanut sauce is so tender and savory. And it’s only a few easy steps!

Whisk the marinade together. Cut the chicken into cubes and leave to rest in the marinade for a few hours. Put the chicken on skewers and cook on the barbecue grill. Whisk together the peanut sauce, and BOOM! Done! 

Try it and enjoy 😉 

If you make this recipe and love it, take a photo and share it on instagram and facebook! Just make sure to tag @TheForeignFork and hashtag #TheForeignFork. If you liked this recipe, you’ll also love this Qofte from Albania and this Wiener Schnitzel from Austria. Thanks for stopping by! I’ll see you next week.

Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce

Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce is a spectacular meal from Brunei. Chicken pieces are marinated in a Thai-flavored marinade and then grilled on a barbecue grill. They are then dipped in scrumptious peanut sauce to be enjoyed!

Course dinner, Main Course, meat
Cuisine brunei
Cook Time 20 minutes
Marinade Time 2 hours
Servings 20 skewers

Ingredients

  • 2.5 lb boneless skinless chicken thighs

Marinade Ingredients

  • ½ cup coconut milk
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp curry powder
  • ¼ tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp chopped garlic
  • ¼ tsp ground ginger
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp lime juice

Peanut Sauce Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup peanut butter
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tsp ginger
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1/2 tsp chili paste to taste
  • 1 tsp Apple cider vinegar
  • 1/3 cup water or more depending on desired thickness

Instructions

  1. If you are using wooden skewers, soak the skewers in water overnight before you cook the recipe.
  2. Trim the fat from the chicken thighs. Cut into about 1 inch cubes.
  3. Combine the marinade ingredients in a small bowl.
  4. In a gallon ziplock bag, add the cubed chicken pieces and pour the marinade. Put the ziplock bag in the fridge and let rest for about 2 hours or overnight.
  5. Once the chicken has marinated, place three cubed pieces side by side on the wooden skewer. Make sure to skewer the chicken the long way.
  6. Use a pastry brush to brush olive oil on your barbecue grill to keep the chicken from sticking.
  7. Heat the grill on a low heat, and slowly grill the satay about ten minutes on each side. Check the chicken frequently to ensure it isn’t burning. Chicken is completely cooked when it reaches an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit.
  8. While the chicken is cooking, whisk together the peanut sauce ingredients, adding more water according to desired thickness.
  9. Enjoy!
  10. Leave a comment on this post letting me know what you thought.

Recipe Notes

Recipe Copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational and personal use only. 

Silpancho from Bolivia

Bolivian Silpancho made with rice, a pan-fried burger, salsa, potatoes, and an egg

Silpancho is an incredible Bolivian meal made by combining many ingredients on a platter. It begins with a bed of rice and is topped with a pan-fried burger, salsa, fried potatoes, and an over easy egg.

Yo, so let’s talk about burgers. As we’ve established on this blog, I’m not really a big meat gal. Give me pasta; give me vegetables; give me potatoes. But meat… I don’t know, you guys; meat is just not really my thing.

Sometimes my dad will throw some burgers on the grill, and on those days I always pout just a little bit. Having my whole meal revolve around a huge chunk of meat just isn’t enjoyable for me. But, until now, I’ve never had a pan-fried burger. And I’ve never had Silpancho. And that has made all the difference in the world.

What is Silpancho?

Silpancho is preeeetty much Heaven On A Plate. It’s a big platter made of a bunch of yummy things all mixed together and then eaten in one heaping pile of yum.

So basically, Silpacho starts off with a bed of white rice. Then, on top of it, you layer fried potatoes, a breaded and fried burger patty, some tomato salsa, and, to top it all off, an over easy egg. Someone call 9-1-1, my heart just stopped.

Close up of Silpancho from Bolivia with a broken yolk

History of The Dish

Silpancho was first invented by Celia la Fuente Peredo from Cochabamba, and she has since received awards for the creation of this recipe (both in 2000 and 2010). Silpancho is such a large part of Bolivian culture that in some restaurants, it is the only recipe prepared.

In Cochabamba, each restaurant has a light outside. If the light is on and uncovered, the restaurant is currently serving Silpancho for everyone to enjoy. If the light is covered, it means that the restaurant is currently in the process of preparing more Silpancho. As you can tell, Silpancho is a cultural phenomenon in Bolivia. It is a favorite of the country, and a must try if you ever visit. Luckily, you can also use the recipe below to try it at home!

Making Your Silpancho

Okay, so truth be told, there are a lot of steps to this recipe. But it’s worth it, trust me. The salsa comes together quick, and the Adobo seasonings are quite easy to mix right into the burger meat. The rice could be a lengthy step if you let it, but quite frankly, I used minute-white rice and it didn’t change the amount of YUMs that I received from my friends and family.  Take the time and throw it together. This is one dish you really, REALLY don’t want to miss out on.

Did you enjoy this Silpancho? Make sure to also check out this recipe for Albanian Qofte and this recipe for Austrian Wiener Schnitzel. If you make this recipe, please take a photo and share it on Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #TheForeignFork! Keep checking back for more recipes to come!

Silpancho (Bolivia)

Silpancho is an incredible Bolivian meal made by combining many ingredients on a platter. It begins with a bed of rice and is topped with a pan-fried burger, salsa, fried potatoes, and an over easy egg.

Course dinner
Cuisine Bolivian
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings 4 Servings

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup white rice I used Minute Rice, but you can also use uncooked white rice
  • 2 Idaho Potatoes peeled
  • 16 oz ground beef
  • 3 Roma tomatoes chopped
  • ½ red onion chopped
  • ¼ cup chopped parsley
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • Oil for frying I used sunflower oil
  • 1 cup bread crumbs plain
  • 6 eggs 2 for dipping, 4 for frying
  • 2 tsp garlic powder
  • ½ tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • tsp black pepper

Instructions

  1. Peel the two potatoes and place in a pot of boiling water. Boil until the potatoes are soft, but not falling apart if poked by a fork… about 10 minutes. Remove from water and allow to cool in the fridge.

  2. Cook the rice according to the instructions on the box/bag.

  3. In a separate bowl, mix together chopped red onions, roma tomatoes, parsley, olive oil, and vinegar. Set aside.

  4. In a separate bowl, combine ground meat with garlic powder, paprika, salt, cumin, and black pepper.

  5. In a frying pan, pour enough oil to make a layer across the pan about 1/4 of an inch thick. Heat the oil until hot enough to fry. I usually test the oil by placing the end of a wooden chopstick in the oil. If bubbles form around the chopstick wood within 3-5 seconds, the oil is hot enough to fry with.

  6. While the oil is heating up, crack two eggs into a small bowl and whisk. Pour the bread crumbs into a separate bowl.

  7. Form the raw, seasoned meat into four thin patties. Dip the patties in the whisked egg, then dip them in the breading. Finally, place the patties in the oil and fry until cooked through, about 2-3 minutes on each side.

  8. Next, remove the potatoes from the fridge. Slice into thin rounds and fry these potatoes in the oil as well, until they begin to brown. About 5-6 minutes on each side (more or less to fit your preference).

  9. Finally, heat a frying pan and cook the remaining four eggs over-easy so that the whites are cooked through, but the yolk is runny.

  10. To assemble the platter, form a bed of rice at the bottom. Place the fried patties on top of the rice. Next, lay the fried potatoes around the plate. Spoon the salsa over the top of the rice and potatoes. Finally, place the fried eggs on top. This can be done on four individual platters or one large one.

  11. Enjoy the meal! And leave a comment on this page letting me know how you liked it.

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For educational or personal use only. 

Borscht Soup Recipe from Belarus

Borscht Soup

This brightly colored Borscht Soup is a classic recipe from Belarus. Made with beets, potatoes, tomatoes and more, it is best served with sour cream, dill, and, if you’re feeling adventurous, even a hard-boiled egg!

During the summer of 2017, I worked part-time as a waitress at an upscale restaurant in Kalamazoo, Michigan. The food at this place was DELICIOUS, and they were especially famous for their awesome soups, particularly their cream of mushroom.

Every day that there was a new soup on the menu was a great day, because it meant I got to try something new (plus, the soups were the only things the servers were allowed to eat without paying… That summer, I ate A LOT of soup.)

One day, I saw a soup on the menu that I had never heard of before… Borscht. When I asked one of the food runners how I should describe it to customers he said “it’s a cold beet soup… we serve it with hard-boiled eggs.”

If I could have run out of the restaurant at that very second, I would have run faaaarrrr away from this soup. Everything about that description made me anxious. Cold soup? Made out of beets? Topped with eggs?!?! No thank you!!!!

So, of course, the Borscht Soup was the only soup that summer that I didn’t try.

Borscht Soup

Borscht Soup from Belarus

Now here we are. It’s Belarus week, and Belarusians LOVE their Borscht. So, I swallow my pride, employ Mama Foreign Fork to grate me up some beets, and throw a pot on the stove.

This soup is bomb. The color is gorgeous; the taste is delicious, and I am quite the fan! So, my readers, don’t run from this soup. Embrace it. Try it. It’s delicious and you’ll thank me for this advice.

What is Borscht Soup?

I’m going to try to describe this better than my coworker did two years ago. Borscht is made by simmering beets, carrots, potatoes, and tomatoes on the stove with some broth. Eventually, the vegetables break down, the soup thickens, and out comes a thick, yummy soup that is the most beautiful color I have ever seen.

Now, Borscht soup is a Belarusian/Russian dish, so it has an acidic taste. The beets mixed with tomatoes and apple cider vinegar give a different flavor profile than I’m used to in my soups, but it’s incredible! This acidity is great to enjoy, but the toppings on the soup can help bring your soup to your level of comfort.

Borscht Soup

What Ingredients are In this Recipe?

Butter
Garlic
Onion
Beets
Carrots
Chicken broth
Idaho potatoes
Tomato
Salt
Pepper
Dried dill
Apple cider vinegar
Tomato paste
Hard boiled eggs
Fresh dill weed for garnishment

For full ingredient measurements and step by step instructions, visit the recipe card at the bottom of the page.

How to Make this Recipe

In a large pot, melt the butter. Cook garlic and onion in the butter until translucent, or about 5 minutes.

Add the beets and carrots to the pot along with the broth.

Cover and bring the broth to a boil. Once boiling, reduce heat and simmer for about 15 minutes.

Stir in potatoes, tomato paste, apple cider vinegar, dill, salt, and pepper. Cook, uncovered for about 30 minutes, until the soup reduces and gets a bit thicker.

About five minutes before the soup is done, add the tomatoes.

Garnish with sour cream, fresh dill, and a hard boiled egg. Enjoy!

Is Borscht Soup Served Cold or Hot?

Honestly, I liked either. I think I’m a little more partial to the warm borscht, but you can serve it either way!

Some recipes for borscht can include meat or fish. If you choose to add any of those additions to this recipe for Borscht soup, you may want to serve the soup hot.

However, if you follow the recipe as is, keeping it purely vegetarian, I would advocate for you to eat it cold. Whenever I’ve seen Borscht Soup served in restaurants, it has always been cold as well.

Borscht Soup

How to Serve Borscht

As mentioned above, you can serve your soup hot or cold, depending on personal preference.

Arguably even more important is the toppings! You can choose to top your Borscht Soup with whatever you’d like, but I would recommend some fresh dill, a dollop of sour cream, and some chopped hard boiled eggs.

When topping the soups, make sure to ladle them into individual bowls and distribute the toppings from there. You don’t want to add the toppings to the entire pot of soup, or they may sink or be lost by the time the entire pot is eaten.

My brother likes to mix his soup together to spread that sour cream throughout the entire bowl! If you’d prefer to eat your soup without toppings, you can do that as well!

How Do You Shred Beets for Borscht?

To shred your beets for your Borscht Soup, peel the beets using a vegetable peeler. Take care not to wear any clothes that you care a lot about, as the beets will dye your hands red and it can easily stain clothing as well.

Once the beets are peeled, use a cheese grater to grate them. Use the largest side of the cheese grater, and rub the beet along the side of it, the same motion you would use to shred cheese! Your beets are now grated.

Try making this Borscht Soup yourself! If you do, post a photo of it on Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag #TheForeignFork. Don’t forget to leave a comment on this post letting me know what you thought!!

If you want to try some more Foreign Fork recipes, make sure to check out these recipes I’ve picked out just for you:

Borscht Soup

This brightly colored Borscht Soup is a classic recipe from Belarus. Made with beets, potatoes, tomatoes and more, it is best served with sour cream, dill, and, if you’re feeling adventurous, even a hard-boiled egg! 

Course Appetizer, Main Course, Soup
Cuisine Belarus
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Servings 10 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp butter
  • ½ tbsp garlic
  • 1 onion chopped
  • 4 medium beets peeled and shredded
  • 3 carrots peeled and shredded
  • 6 cups chicken broth
  • 2 medium idaho potatoes cubed
  • 1 large tomato peeled and diced
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp pepper
  • ½ tsp dried dill
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 6 oz. can tomato paste
  • Hard boiled eggs
  • Fresh dill weed for garnishment

Instructions

  1. In a large pot, melt butter. Cook garlic and onion in the butter until translucent, or about 5 minutes.
  2. Add the beets and carrots to the pot along with the broth.
  3. Cover and bring the broth to a boil. Once boiling, reduce heat and simmer for about 15 minutes.
  4. Stir in potatoes, tomato paste, apple cider vinegar, dill, salt, and pepper. Cook, uncovered for about 30 minutes, until the soup reduces and gets a bit thicker.
  5. About five minutes before the soup is done, add the tomatoes.
  6. Garnish with sour cream, fresh dill, and a hard boiled egg. Enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Recipe copyright The Foreign Fork. For personal or educational use only.